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Gear / Technical Help => Ask The Tapers => Topic started by: down2earthlandscaper on October 05, 2016, 11:38:31 AM

Title: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: down2earthlandscaper on October 05, 2016, 11:38:31 AM
Not sure where this question should go….

On the archive I often see "these are 24bit flac files and not intended for burning to CD"
Isn't most modern burning software capable of of doing the necessary conversion? Not that I'm burning many cd's these days, but just wondering if  it's really necessary to only try to burn the 16bit files.

Thanks
Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: Ronmac on October 05, 2016, 11:51:38 AM
CD format must be 44.1 khz 16 bit to conform to Red Book standard and be playable by standard CD players.

Most modern CD authoring programs will convert to that format if you provide a 24 bit file.

I would always archive the file at the native recorded resolution or the highest bit rate the media it is stored on will support. In most (non-CD) media that is 24 bit, with some recorders/DAWs supporting 32 floating bit.
Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: todd e on October 05, 2016, 11:53:15 AM
well the 24bit files typically need to be resampled and dithered down to 16bit (i.e. CD qual), before being able to make the CD.  While what you say is true, in that most burning programs are very capable, they arent often capable enough to do those higher level processing steps.  Chances are if you see a 24bit recording 'not for CDs' that the taper also seeded a 16bit version, ymmv.

Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: down2earthlandscaper on October 05, 2016, 12:16:10 PM
Cool. Thanks for the fast replies.

I always record in 24bit, barring some memory card space emergency…

I'm relatively new to uploading to the LMA, so my question was really more on the side of "do I really need to upload the 16bit file sets"

CD format must be 44.1 khz 16 bit to conform to Red Book standard and be playable by standard CD players.

Most modern CD authoring programs will convert to that format if you provide a 24 bit file.

I would always archive the file at the native recorded resolution or the highest bit rate the media it is stored on will support. In most (non-CD) media that is 24 bit, with some recorders/DAWs supporting 32 floating bit.

I'll start with posting the 24 bit versions and get to uploading 16bit when I get time… I will need to remember to add the step of creating the 16bit versions in the post editing process so that I can upload those as well for the CD burning folk out there!
Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: todd e on October 06, 2016, 08:35:09 AM
might as well seed the 16bit source as well, otherwise you are entrusting LMA or other streaming services to do the processing.  plus with the LMA, not like there is a space issue.  look at it as insurance!
Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: yug du nord on October 06, 2016, 10:29:45 AM
if you wanted to, you can write 24 bit files on CDR's for storage.  although that doesn't make much sense since a CDR can't hold much data.
you just can't play 24 bit files in a CD player.
Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: lsd2525 on October 06, 2016, 10:53:12 AM
Can't some DVD players play 24 bit files?
Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: dnsacks on October 06, 2016, 03:32:04 PM
afaik, since 24/48 and 24/96 are native audio resolutions for the dvd video format, all dvd players can play 24/48 or 24/96 material -- you can burn the audio with blank video to a in the video dvd format.
Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: Taper Chris on October 18, 2016, 05:32:02 AM
Most casual listeners download the mp3. Then may burn it to cd. I do this often for our car CD player. We have spotty phone service on these back roads. Sounds fine
Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: 108Ω on October 18, 2016, 05:51:19 AM
CD format must be 44.1 khz 16 bit to conform to Red Book standard and be playable by standard CD players.

Most modern CD authoring programs will convert to that format if you provide a 24 bit file.

I would always archive the file at the native recorded resolution or the highest bit rate the media it is stored on will support. In most (non-CD) media that is 24 bit, with some recorders/DAWs supporting 32 floating bit.

You mean to manually convert the file, making informed choices, I think.
Dither and sampling settings will affect the sound quality.
Truncation from 24 to 16 bit would likely have the grossest change to the sound, but dither matters.
Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: gewwang on October 18, 2016, 11:12:03 AM
What's a CD?
Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: jefflester on October 18, 2016, 10:07:14 PM
What's a CD?
http://taperssection.com/index.php?topic=60281
Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: ~Jon Stoppable on October 18, 2016, 10:16:09 PM
None of those were ripped pre-sale, of course  :-X
Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: gewwang on October 18, 2016, 10:27:06 PM
None of those were ripped pre-sale, of course  :-X

Is it illegal to buy a cd, import the songs into itunes and then sell the cd?
Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: ~Jon Stoppable on October 18, 2016, 11:10:35 PM
I don't know if it's ever been litigated, but you are allowed to make a copy of music on a CD that you own.  One would surmise that when you no longer own the CD, you no longer have a valid license for that recording.  I think you would have a stronger argument if you simply discarded the CDs as you never transferred your license, but if you sell that CD then your license goes with the physical medium.

See this and the comments below (especially the one from the lawyer):

http://audiophilereview.com/audiophile-music/rip-then-sell-your-cds.html

Way down in this thread is another comment by an actual IP lawyer:

http://www.stereophile.com/content/selling-cds-after-ripping-1

So, who knows?  Thus, this emoticon:  :-X

Title: Re: CD Burning, 24bit, 16bit?
Post by: gewwang on October 19, 2016, 12:10:51 AM
I don't know if it's ever been litigated, but you are allowed to make a copy of music on a CD that you own.  One would surmise that when you no longer own the CD, you no longer have a valid license for that recording.  I think you would have a stronger argument if you simply discarded the CDs as you never transferred your license, but if you sell that CD then your license goes with the physical medium.

See this and the comments below (especially the one from the lawyer):

http://audiophilereview.com/audiophile-music/rip-then-sell-your-cds.html

Way down in this thread is another comment by an actual IP lawyer:

http://www.stereophile.com/content/selling-cds-after-ripping-1

So, who knows?  Thus, this emoticon:  :-X

After a few google searches, it looks like it is illegal to buy/rip/sell cds.

It's even illegal to destroy or giveaway cds without deleting all digital copies of the music after the cd is no longer in your possession.