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Author Topic: Question about DPA4022  (Read 482 times)

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Offline phil_er_up

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Question about DPA4022
« on: January 02, 2017, 08:18:50 AM »
Someone was selling DPA4022 and they listed the specs as follows:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Cartridge Type:
 Pre-polarized condenser B&K Type MM0056
Principle of operation:
Pressure gradient
Frequency Range:
On-axis: 40Hz - 20kHz ?2dB
Cartridge lower limiting frequency (-3dB):
Proximity influenced
Directional characteristics:
Cardioid
Phase response:
Phase matching between any two microphones: ?15? (100Hz to 20kHz)
Sensitivity:
Nominally 7mV/Pa (at 1kHz)
Equivalent noise level A-weighted:
Typ. 20dB(A) re. 20 ?Pa
Equivalent noise level CCIR 468-1:
Typ. 25dB (max. 28dB)  Maximum sound pressure level:
 145dB SPL peak
Total harmonic distortion:
110dB SPL peak (<0.5% THD)
Preamplifier frequency range:

Preamplifier output impedance:
<300 Ohm
Cable drive capability:
Up to 100m (328ft)
Microphone Length:
30mm (1.18in); 71mm (2.8in) (incl. connector)
Microphone diameter:
19mm (0.75in)
Weight:
 33g 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What does this line mean and what does it do with regard to phase and what happens below 100HZ?
"Phase matching between any two microphones: ?15? (100Hz to 20kHz)"
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Offline Gutbucket

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Re: Question about DPA4022
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2017, 03:04:40 PM »
Quote
Phase response:
Phase matching between any two microphones: ?15? (100Hz to 20kHz)

I assume the unit of measure for that value is degrees, meaning the phase response of the pair is matched to within a 15 degree total tolerance difference range between 100Hz and 20kHz.

Perhaps DSatz will reply and bring us all up to speed on the implications.  I'm interested myself.  Until then here is my speculation-

It's relatively common to measure both frequency response and phase responses when determining a match between microphone pairs, but I don't know of other manufacturers who commonly specify that as a standard deviation specification for their pressure gradient microphones intended for music recording.  It is a common specification for measurement omnis which used in sound intensity probes, since that difference needs to be corrected for to get an accurate intensity measurement.  And it may also be common to do so for pressure gradient microphones intended for measurement purposes. That DPA includes that specification for a microphone intended for music recording rather than measurement purposes may be rooted in DPAs history as an outgrowth from B&K who specialize in acoustic measurement equipment and microphones.

In any case, within 15 degrees is a sufficiently close phase match such that you needn't be concerned about it for our purposes.  I suspect that degree of difference to be inconsequential using typical near-spaced stereo microphone configurations (which will produce ever increasing phase-differences as the frequency in question becomes higher), and perhaps only a potential implication for fully coincident arrangements (if the match was worse).  But again, it probably doesn't matter much for music recording.
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Offline phil_er_up

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Re: Question about DPA4022
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2017, 11:20:26 AM »
Quote
Phase response:
Phase matching between any two microphones: ?15? (100Hz to 20kHz)

I assume the unit of measure for that value is degrees, meaning the phase response of the pair is matched to within a 15 degree total tolerance difference range between 100Hz and 20kHz.

Perhaps DSatz will reply and bring us all up to speed on the implications.  I'm interested myself.  Until then here is my speculation-

It's relatively common to measure both frequency response and phase responses when determining a match between microphone pairs, but I don't know of other manufacturers who commonly specify that as a standard deviation specification for their pressure gradient microphones intended for music recording.  It is a common specification for measurement omnis which used in sound intensity probes, since that difference needs to be corrected for to get an accurate intensity measurement.  And it may also be common to do so for pressure gradient microphones intended for measurement purposes. That DPA includes that specification for a microphone intended for music recording rather than measurement purposes may be rooted in DPAs history as an outgrowth from B&K who specialize in acoustic measurement equipment and microphones.

In any case, within 15 degrees is a sufficiently close phase match such that you needn't be concerned about it for our purposes.  I suspect that degree of difference to be inconsequential using typical near-spaced stereo microphone configurations (which will produce ever increasing phase-differences as the frequency in question becomes higher), and perhaps only a potential implication for fully coincident arrangements (if the match was worse).  But again, it probably doesn't matter much for music recording.

Thank you Gutbucket to take the time to explain that. What you wrote made sense to me. What I could not really figure out is what the number "15" had to do with it.

Everyday is a gift. Enjoy each one!
Forward motion bring positive results.

 

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