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Author Topic: replacing audio on a video?  (Read 6382 times)

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Offline Teen Wolf Blitzer

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replacing audio on a video?
« on: May 19, 2007, 11:47:59 AM »
Hey all.  I rolled 4 audio channels last night for Danny Barnes.  Also videoed it from the balcony.  Needless to say the camera audio is undesirable.  What is a good way to replace the audio on the video?  Recommended software?  I already have a Plextor video>pc thingy so getting it on my pc is taken care of. Or if anyone wants to do it for me that would be sweet to.  It's not a great camera at all.  Just an 8mm Sony Handicam.  Thanks for any guidance.  Cheers all.

Offline coloartist

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Re: replacing audio on a video?
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2007, 05:23:55 PM »
Sony Vegas, works very well. Takes a little learn time, but I get better with all the other functions everytime I use it.
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Offline Adam.

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Re: replacing audio on a video?
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2007, 07:57:22 PM »
Sony Vegas, works very well. Takes a little learn time, but I get better with all the other functions everytime I use it.

This is exactly what I used. It's a real pain in the arse though, and will take hours sometimes to get a perfect sync - but well worth it.

Offline BayTaynt3d

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Re: replacing audio on a video?
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2007, 02:04:03 AM »
Gets easier with practice though... ;)
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Offline SClassical

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Re: replacing audio on a video?
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2007, 02:58:58 PM »
I'm actually trying to do the same thing with my miniDVs.

I was going to get Vegas but I changed my mind after reading this link:

http://video-editing-software-review.toptenreviews.com/

I ended up got powerdirector off someone.

From many reviews it seems like an easy program to use.

Has anyone used powerdirector to sync a picture file with a sound file?
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Offline guitard

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Re: replacing audio on a video?
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2007, 01:29:37 AM »
Sony Vegas, works very well. Takes a little learn time, but I get better with all the other functions everytime I use it.

This is exactly what I used. It's a real pain in the arse though, and will take hours sometimes to get a perfect sync - but well worth it.
With modern digital recordings, getting them in synch should only be a matter of minutes.  At least, that's been my experience while authoring hundreds of DVDS.

Old analog recordings are an entirely different matter though.
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stevetoney

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Re: replacing audio on a video?
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2007, 09:20:22 AM »
Most 'good' video processing software has the ability to strip the audio from the video.  I agree that Vegas is kinda pain in the ass to learn, but worth it if you plan to do much video work in the future.  My easy 'go to' software package is called DVD Lab Pro.  It's got all the tools, but in spite of the name, it's not really a pro tool.  I'd call it more of a very powerful ameteur software package.  Even though it's not pro, it still does everything you want and is really easy to use and is still really powerful.  The reason I say it's not pro is just that there are some limitations on the amount of creativity you can use to get a 100% pro quality production that looks like a pro DVD.  My own patience doesn't have time for that anyway, so that's why I always end up opting for the ease of DVD Lab pro.  So, the only time I personnally use Vegas is when I need to mix and then master multi-cam videos.  But even then, once the video is mastered, I use DVD Lab Pro to compile the DVD and menu's and all that. 

Anyway, it doesn't have to take hours to get a perfect audio synch on your video, like someone suggested, especially if there are no drop outs on either you video or your audio masters.  Just do what I do.

Obvioiusly, the first you want to do is commit you audio and video to electronic format.  Master up your video as you want it by removing the crap from the beginning and end.  DO NOT remove the original audio at this point.  Keep the original camera audio with the source video.

Again, it's easiest to synch aud and vid if there aren't any drops from the middle of either the master video (and for that matter, the master audio), but if you have to cut anything out of the middle of your video master, then just write down the approximate time location of these cuts.  This will help you later to find the same spots when you're mastering up the audio.

After the video is mastered the way you want it, strip the audio off of the video but make sure you save this audio file onto your harddrive.  You might need to use some third party software to convert the audio file format at this point.

Open this audio file in Audition (or whatever audio mastering program you use) and also open the master audio file in another window...or in a second track...it doesn't matter.

The goal now is to use your audio program to manipulate the master audio to exactly parallel the raw audio from the video.  Obviously, once they are completely parallel, then when you mix the master audio to the video, it will align perfectly and the audio will be perfectly in synch with the video.  This really isn't very hard to do at all.

Compare the master timing to the audio on the video by selecting two points in both audios that are exactly the same points...the longer the duration the better as long as there are no drop outs.  Obviously, this is where the 'no dropouts' concept can really make this process much easier becuase if there are no drop outs on either the video OR the master audio, then you just need to select an audio cue from the beginning of the show and at the end.  A sonic cue is any specific distinct audio point taht can be located specifically on both recordings...such as a specific drum beat, or the start of a guitar note.

Now use the stretch or shink function of Audition to make your recording the exact same length.  Obviously this whole process compensates for any slight duration differences caused by differences in recording speeds.

If there ARE drop outs, then you will need to break the audio files up and sorta piece the master file together considering the drop outs.  If the drop outs are on the video, then the master audio needs to have the drop outs cut from the audio also.

So, once you've gone through this process and have your master audio synched up, just mix the master audio back together with the video instead of your camera audio and, WALLA!

I personally don't think that the above process takes all that much time at all.  If there are no drop outs, it can be done in about 15 or 20 minutes, although it will take at least that long or longer for your video software to strip the audio off from the video.

Hope this helps!

Offline BlackLab

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Re: replacing audio on a video?
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2007, 01:49:58 PM »
I use Vegas myself. You can also export cam audio to sep audio editing application like Cool Edit or Sound Forge

Offline gsh

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Re: replacing audio on a video?
« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2007, 03:49:27 PM »
Most 'good' video processing software has the ability to strip the audio from the video.  I agree that Vegas is kinda pain in the ass to learn, but worth it if you plan to do much video work in the future.  My easy 'go to' software package is called DVD Lab Pro. 
DVDLab Pro is an authoring tool - it has no editing features to speak of and is useless in this situation. It's very specifically designed solely for authoring DVDs. I'm not sure why you've brought it up in an editing context?

As said already, syncing modern digital recordings is easy enough and not particularly time consuming as long as not much editing of either is needed (missing parts of the video needing to be edited from the audio for example).
Adobe Premiere Elements is a great editing package for beginners - the learning curve isn't ridiculously hard and it also gives a good solid foundation for moving on to the full version of the software if you so desire.
It's cheap and very powerful and also includes a (very basic) DVD authoring tool for the novice.

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Re: replacing audio on a video?
« Reply #9 on: August 05, 2007, 05:53:52 PM »
I think the programs I used last time I did a sync was DVD decrypter to demux audio from from video, wavelab to sync and trim the new audio to the old audio and then DVDLab Pro to mux the new audio and video together.  It was a real huge PIA but if you do it a bunch it gets to be like riding a bike.  You just hop on and do it.

Offline yousef

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Re: replacing audio on a video?
« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2007, 06:53:24 PM »

After the video is mastered the way you want it, strip the audio off of the video but make sure you save this audio file onto your harddrive.  You might need to use some third party software to convert the audio file format at this point.


Can you recommend a good (possibly free!) program for stripping the audio from AVIs for this purpose?

Many thanks for the very useful post, too.
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Offline stantheman1976

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Re: replacing audio on a video?
« Reply #11 on: August 08, 2007, 10:57:49 PM »
Sony Vegas, hands down.  I do this all the time with 2-3 cameras and separate audio source.  It's very intimidating at first, but once it clicks you "get it".  Here's where I learned from:
http://www.martyhedler.com/homepage/Vegas_Tutorials.html

With digital camcorder and digital audio sources it is extremely easy.  The timing may be a bit different so one of the sources may drift away from the other.  With Vegas you can adjust timing easy.  Go to the end of the waveform in your timeline and hold your mouse over the end.  Hold the CTRL key and you'll see a "~" sign.  Move your mouse left or right the shrink or expand the track.  You can easily sync a 2 hour recording in minutes.  One important thing, go to Options and make sure "Quantize to frames" is unchecked.  If that is checked you have to adjust at least 1 full frame.  With that option unchecked you can adjust in any increment you please.

As said before, with digital sources it's easy.  With analog, ehhhh....NOT so easy.  The internal parts on digital devices like MiniDV, hard drive, and flash recorders have a constant speed.  A hard drive recorder may record a tiny bit slower than a flash recorder for example so when you match the two they will sync at the beginning and one will drift from the other later one but the drift will be constant and easily adjusted. 

The mechanisms on analog recorders will vary and do not run at constant speed.  One part will be synced then 5 minutes in one track is 10 seconds ahead and 10 minutes later that same track is 5 seconds behind.   You have to cut the tracks into small segments and sync each individually.  It sucks BIG time.

Maybe some of this helps.  This stuff can be very intimidating at first but it's like anything.  Once you get the hang of it and it clicks it's easy.

Offline wilsonedits

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Re: replacing audio on a video?
« Reply #12 on: August 13, 2007, 03:18:12 PM »
its not going to look right if you try to exactly match audio thats from the cam in the balcony... because that audio is off as well...
you will defintely want to use a program like vegas where you can adjust stuff frame by frame
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Offline stantheman1976

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Re: replacing audio on a video?
« Reply #13 on: August 13, 2007, 06:24:54 PM »
I have never mixed two sources that matched up perfectly all the way through and I've used a few different recorders and cameras.  I started out using Goldwave's "Time Warp" feature and adjusting it about 1/10 second at a time.  Then I learned Vegas and have never looked back.  Vegas really does make it easy to mix sources. 

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Re: replacing audio on a video?
« Reply #14 on: August 21, 2007, 10:25:42 AM »


Can you recommend a good (possibly free!) program for stripping the audio from AVIs for this purpose?

Loading an avi in Goldwave will give you an audio file to work in in Goldwave. Ofcourse you're free to save it without editting.
A really nice avi editor (even muxing audio and vid) is virtualdub. (vdubmod for mpg-streams; nandub for avi's with VBR mp3).
Ofcourse Vegas is nice, but does cost a lot. Can be hard to get used to. Ideal for syncing audio to vid.
Hope this helps. GL

 

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