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Offline adrjork

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A boom pole question
« on: June 19, 2017, 02:24:12 PM »
Hi everyone,

First of all I know NOTHING about boompoles, but I suppose I will need one (I probably said something similar about women years ago... but this is another story!)

I have two very basic questions about boompoles:

1. Why Panamic booms cost 10 times Rode/K&M/Beyerdynamic booms? I can suppose carbon fibre vs aluminium, weight, etc. Or is there also something about noise? This is a very important to me: I don't know how a boom works, if there are noisy vs silent booms, but if there is this kind of difference, please tell me which boom is really silent? Are there other main differences I should know? Ambient booms could be a good choice, or there is something cheaper that works as well?

2. I would use the boom alternatively with two different mic-blimps: one with XLR-3-pin, and the other with XLR-5-pin. I saw that there are also cabled booms (useful, I suppose) but I CAN'T buy two different cabled booms to fit the two different blimps' plugs! I want to buy only one boom, so I wonder if there is a good single solution for both the blimps. Here the question: is it better to fix externally a normal XLR cable onto a non-cabled boompole with scotch-tape, or does it exist an "empty" type of boompole that gives you the possibility to change the internal cable? (In this way I could set the boom by my own, with a XLR-5-pin cable or a XLR-3-pin, as needed.)

So, which is your advice?

Thanks really a lot.

Offline Ronmac

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Re: A boom pole question
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2017, 03:40:54 PM »
Not sure what you are going to be using a boom for...movie set dialogue (where you may be hoisting and holding over head for long hours), run and gun ENG, nature recording, corporate video shoots, what reach do you need, occasional or daily use, etc...

The answer to that question will inform the others.

You generally get what you pay for, and should be prepared to pay for what you need.

If lightweight and zero risk of failure in a remote and hostile environment is important, you will need to look at the top of the range. If you are standing on a courtroom step and need to get a few feet up and over, you really shouldn't need to have anything in the premium category.


Offline adrjork

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Re: A boom pole question
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2017, 07:04:42 PM »
Thanks for your replay Ronmac.
You are right: I have to describe the use of the boom I'll plan. I'll use two mics (never together, always alternatively): an hypercardioid (AT4053B, 3-pin) and a stereoXY (BP4025, 5-pin). I'll use the hyper for internal foley takes, the stereo for field takes, and both for capturing sounds outdoor. When outdoor, I'll use blimps (one shorter with 3-pin plug for the hyper, and one longer with 5-pin plug for the stereo). All what I want to record are sounds and noises, so NO dialogues at all: I'll work purely as a foley/field recordist. BUT I'll probably have to do some run & gun: i.e. following my walking talent to record the sound of the footsteps, so I'll have to move.
Now, ideally - having the money - I'd buy two different booms: one with 5-pin internal cable (for the stereo blimp) and another one with 3-pin internal cable (for the hyper blimp), but unfortunally I have to pay attention to the budget, so I'm trying to find a single good boompole that fits both the two different blimps.

So m questions are:
1. Can a cheap (aluminium, not-carbon) boom make the sound quality worse (perhaps squeaking itself), or the material concerns only the weight of the boom?
2. Keeping the cable internally (in the boom) can avoid capturing noises and pops, or it is simply an ergonomic facilitation?

Thanks a lot for the help.

Offline Ronmac

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Re: A boom pole question
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2017, 07:44:51 PM »
For your purposes I think that buying the top tier pole is overkill. A good budget option is the Rode Boompole https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/392860-REG/Rode_BOOMPOLE_Boompole_for_Rode_NTG_1.html

I have one of these and have used it successfully for feature film, documentary and foley work. It is heavier than a CF pole, but if you don't have to hoist it over your head for hours at a time the slight increase in weight shouldn't be an issue.

It accommodates an internal cable, any regular mic cable of suitable length will work, and you can remove and install a new cable in a couple of minutes. Since a 3 pin and 5 pin Neutrik ends are the same outside diameter either one will work.

Mine has held up well during the couple of years I have owned it that I wouldn't hesitate to buy another. If the budget allowed I wouldn't balk at buying a more expensive model, but I don't see the one I own hold me back in any way, for my use.

Offline adrjork

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Re: A boom pole question
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2017, 07:54:30 PM »
That's a smart and very clear reply Ronmac, and I thank you so much!
I suppose that this Rode boompole can fit safely any Rycote blimps, right?
And, have you experienced squeaking noises moving the boom? (I mean in run&gun condition, following the talent?)
Thanks a lot for your precious details.

Offline Ronmac

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Re: A boom pole question
« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2017, 08:36:43 PM »
I have never experienced a squeaking sound when moving the pole, but silent booming does take some thought and practice. You must keep the cable taught within the pole. I give it a little tug at the butt end just to make sure once I have set the length of the boom and tightened the compression grips. That keeps the cable from slapping around inside. I also wear gloves to make sure I have a firm grip on the pole. Keep all of your moves deliberate and steady. Practice using the pole with your headphone gain set high and you will find the limits and learn what moves make you uncomfortable and cause problems.

Have fun!

Offline adrjork

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Re: A boom pole question
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2017, 12:16:18 AM »
Thanks a lot for these precious advices!

Offline Ronmac

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Re: A boom pole question
« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2017, 07:52:09 AM »
The Rode Boompole has a 3/8" threaded end, so will mate exactly with the Rycote Blimps (I have 3 different Rycote Blimps that fit well). To use the Rycote Blimps on stands with North American standard 5/8" threaded ends you will need one of these.. https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/576635-REG/Rycote_047302_047302_Mic_Stand_Adapter.html


Offline adrjork

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Re: A boom pole question
« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2017, 10:09:29 AM »
Again, Ronmac, thanks a lot for this important detail. I'm thinking to go for the Rode Boompole Pro (the carbon version of the old aluminium Rode Boompole).

Offline adrjork

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Re: A boom pole question
« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2017, 02:29:15 PM »
Going further, speaking about cable rig, I'd like to know what is in your opinion the most silent cable rig to connect the mic to the recorder in a run&gun situation (for example following the outdoor footstep of the talent during a long walk):

1. A single external straight cable wrapped around the boompole, directly from the blimp plug to the recorder: this means having a dangling last segment of the straight cable (the segment from the end of the boompole to the recorder);

2. A single and totally dangling long coiled cable directly from the blimp plug to the recorder (not wrapped around the boompole);

3. Two cables: a straight cable well wrapped around the boompole, with the male plug fixed to the end of the boompole, where it's connected with another cable, a coiled cable this time, dangling from the end of the boompole to the recorder.

My questions simpy are:

A) Which is the most silent solution for my run&gun situation? And Why?

B) Do you recommend another cable rigging?

Thanks a lot for your help.

 

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