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Offline Moke

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EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« on: October 18, 2017, 06:23:45 PM »
Quote
Sure, the main thing is the is a 9db shelf boost of the low end, the frequency, I don't remember the frequency but roughly 500hz.  This is a parametric eq that I used, the one you showed me is a graphic eq, you can create a similar effect with graphic, but of course some equalizers sound better than others.


OK,... I met a guy that was recording with an elaborate canopy rig a couple of weekends ago.  He was intrigued with my binaural recording, and took those tracks home for a listen, along with his recording.

What should have been a pre-script to this post,... I'm totally clueless about EQ, with exception to using HPF in post-edit processing, on some ridiculously bass heavy reggae recordings.
I was OK with the bass in the binaural recording, but, I'm 35 years trained to listen to live recordings and listen through the bumps and bruises.
This other guy,... studio guy who came out into the wild.  He has a massive bag of processing tricks that I'm clueless about.

He sent me back a track from my binaural, edited with what he said in the above quote (see above)
I asked what it was that he did, and, he responded, and to me it read like gibberish.
Can anyone explain in small words, spelled slowly, what this means?
And what might I do with a graphic equalizer that might mimic what he is suggesting?

I sent this guy a screenshot of the Graphic EQ that I have available Or at least know about). It is from my Sound Studio Felt-tip Software editing program. It is reminiscent of the classic EQ of the 70's/80's, that people made smiling or frowning faces with.
This parametric EQ thing is totally foreign to me.
Help, please and thanks.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2017, 06:30:06 PM by Moke »
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Offline rocksuitcase

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2017, 06:36:29 PM »
Mike,
He lifted everything above 655Hz by a "shelf" of about 8.5 dB   (I'm assuming the shelf is a gradual algorithmic level lift (8.5dB) at all frequencies above the starting frequency-look at the curve to the left of the knobs in your picture)
Then he cut three frequencies; 3.98Khz and 2 Khz by 10dB also gradually cutting everything above 7.55Khz by 2.5 dB (the HI-shelf-gradual algorithmic level cut (2.5dB) at all frequencies below the starting frequency)
« Last Edit: October 18, 2017, 06:40:24 PM by rocksuitcase »
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Offline thatjackelliott

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2017, 07:57:49 PM »
So what are those two notches about?

Offline Moke

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2017, 08:21:07 PM »
Thanks, Kyle!

Does that center dial designation of 25.6 mean anything to you? Anyone?

Are the frequencies represented in those deep dips that steeply rolled off in that region?
wrapping my head around this,...
I hated the old EQ's of yore. I could never get things to sound as nice as just plain old flat.
Qualifying this: His EQ'd sample did sound nice and plush. So, it sparked my interest.
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Offline jefflester

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2017, 09:20:21 PM »
Does that center dial designation of 25.6 mean anything to you? Anyone?
It represents the sharpness of the dip. The bigger the number, the sharper the dip, the narrower the frequency that it is affecting.
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Offline jefflester

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2017, 09:23:13 PM »
Mike,
He lifted everything above 655Hz by a "shelf" of about 8.5 dB   (I'm assuming the shelf is a gradual algorithmic level lift (8.5dB) at all frequencies above the starting frequency-look at the curve to the left of the knobs in your picture)
Then he cut three frequencies; 3.98Khz and 2 Khz by 10dB also gradually cutting everything above 7.55Khz by 2.5 dB (the HI-shelf-gradual algorithmic level cut (2.5dB) at all frequencies below the starting frequency)

I think you've got those backwards. Everything below 655 Hz is being lifted by the 8.5 dB and everything above 7.55 kHz is being cut by 2.5 dB.
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Offline jcable77

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #6 on: October 18, 2017, 09:25:50 PM »
This is something I just found, might she'd a lil light on parametric eq's
Parametric Equalizers
Parametric equalizers are more complex than graphic equalizers, since you can make additional adjustments beyond volume.

A parametric equalizer lets you control three aspects: levels (boosting or cutting decibels), the center/primary frequency, and bandwidth/range (also known as Q or quotient of change) of each frequency. As such, parametric equalizers offer more of a surgical precision when it comes to affecting overall sound.

Like the graphic equalizer, each frequency can have an increase/decrease to decibels/volume. But while graphic equalizers have fixed frequencies, parametric equalizers can choose a center/primary frequency. For example, if a graphic equalizer has a fixed control at 20 Hz, a parametric equalizer can be adjusted to control frequencies at 10 Hz, 15 Hz, 20 Hz, 25 Hz, 30 Hz, and so forth.
The selection of adjustable frequencies (e.g. by ones, fives, or tens) vary by make and model.

A parametric equalizer can also control bandwidth/range – the sloping that affects neighboring frequencies – of each individual frequency. For example, if the center frequency is 30 Hz, a wide bandwidth would also affect frequencies as low as 15 Hz and as high as 45 Hz. A narrow bandwidth might only affect frequencies as low as 25 Hz and as high as 35 Hz. While there is still a sloping effect, parametric equalizers are better able to zero in on and fine tune the shape of specific frequencies without disturbing others too much. This detailed control of tone and sound permits finer adjustments in order to suit particular/personal tastes and/or goals (such as for mixing or recording).
I believe under the knobs those are settings for your bandwidth control. Peak dip means a steep attenuation hence peak and the others are controlling bandwidth more gradual.


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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #7 on: October 18, 2017, 09:29:24 PM »
Mike,
He lifted everything above 655Hz by a "shelf" of about 8.5 dB   (I'm assuming the shelf is a gradual algorithmic level lift (8.5dB) at all frequencies above the starting frequency-look at the curve to the left of the knobs in your picture)
Then he cut three frequencies; 3.98Khz and 2 Khz by 10dB also gradually cutting everything above 7.55Khz by 2.5 dB (the HI-shelf-gradual algorithmic level cut (2.5dB) at all frequencies below the starting frequency)

I think you've got those backwards. Everything below 655 Hz is being lifted by the 8.5 dB and everything above 7.55 kHz is being cut by 2.5 dB.
Sorry, this is correct. Dealing with bad reaction to anti biotics and should have not replied. Just woke up and saw all of this, sorry MIke. I had the concept right but not the direction
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Offline jefflester

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #8 on: October 18, 2017, 09:35:58 PM »
And what might I do with a graphic equalizer that might mimic what he is suggesting?
It's easy enough to do the 8.5 dB low end boost and 2.5 dB high end cut with a normal graphic equalizer. You just adjust all the low freq ones to +8.5 and the high freq ones to -2.5 dB and do a gradual transition between the two between ~700 Hz and ~7 kHz. But there is no way to really do those sharp notches with a graphic EQ. You could try with whatever fixed EQ frequency is closest, but it's going to take out a lot more than what you are intending.
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Offline chk

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2017, 09:36:49 PM »
If you want to better understand/familiarize yourself with EQ i would play around with boosting and cutting across a variety of frequencies and just listening to recordings you’re familiar with on whatever stereo/system you listen to most often. Once you understand which frequencies correspond with problem areas you’re hearing in recordings, or certain elements you want to enhance a bit in the mix, working with a variety of different post processing EQs becomes pretty straightforward. 
For the PA’d omni recorings i’ve done of live rock shows, i’ve found that bass reduction has been probably the most eq’d element of the recording, sometimes boosting highs with a shelf or bell, and targeting bass problem areas (the “boominess” is generally somewhere between 120hz and 280hz or so) with a narrow bell filter.
The eq adjustments that were done to your recording were pretty drastic and i would think really altered the sound (big increase in the lower mids and reduction in the highs) but obviously i haven’t heard the original source!

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2017, 09:37:47 PM »
Here's a pretty straightforward video explaining the use of this Massenburg EQ:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zAEBjAPQhk4
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Offline Moke

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #11 on: October 18, 2017, 09:38:42 PM »
Learning a  lot already! thanks guys.
I actually learned enough to be brave enough to go into a menu heading called Sound Studio>Filter>Audio Units, where I found a Low Shelf, and, High Shelf filters; Apple: AUHighSHelfFilter & AULowShelfFilter, Parametric EQ, amongst other previously unknowns.
So, I toyed around for the last hour or so with the low shelf filter deal,.. I can say that this interests me.

My old Senn MKE2002 omnis have a bass rolloff characteristic that this might be useful for. It used to be a good thing in the heavy amplified bass days, but, is more apparent now in the acoustic music realm.

Mike,
He lifted everything above 655Hz by a "shelf" of about 8.5 dB   (I'm assuming the shelf is a gradual algorithmic level lift (8.5dB) at all frequencies above the starting frequency-look at the curve to the left of the knobs in your picture)
Then he cut three frequencies; 3.98Khz and 2 Khz by 10dB also gradually cutting everything above 7.55Khz by 2.5 dB (the HI-shelf-gradual algorithmic level cut (2.5dB) at all frequencies below the starting frequency)

I think you've got those backwards. Everything below 655 Hz is being lifted by the 8.5 dB and everything above 7.55 kHz is being cut by 2.5 dB.
Sorry, this is correct. Dealing with bad reaction to anti biotics and should have not replied. Just woke up and saw all of this, sorry MIke. I had the concept right but not the direction

no worries. good health to you my friend.

Hey,... I got to go to downtown Hep-A town, San Diego, to pay my property taxes today. We even saw the sidewalk bleaching crew hard at work.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2017, 09:41:10 PM by Moke »
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Offline rocksuitcase

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2017, 11:43:12 AM »
Parametric Eq's are the best IMO. Obviously the world has uses for graphic and such, but when I did FOH and live PA sound, the discovery of parametric EQ's (Ashley, then Meyer Sound) was one of the best tools I ever found. This was in the big bad analog era (1980's) so now with the digital and software age these tools have become miniaturized and the software ones are more affordable compared to their hardware brothers ans sisters.

this Massenburg one looks nice, anyone know of others and/or relative costs of them? (i.e. I am interested in the Ozone software for my processing and am still not committed to any platform yet)
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Offline Gutbucket

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #13 on: October 19, 2017, 01:08:52 PM »
In general EQ can be divided into to general categories- general tone shaping on one hand, and reducing the impact of specific problems on the other.   They are quite different from each other in the way one approaches them and what they sound like (or intentionally don't sound like). 

The screen shot image of the curve your recording acquaintance sent you indicates he used both approaches- the broad rise in the low frequency area is tonal shaping produced via a broad shelf-filter which effects everything below about 600Hz or so.   Think of shelf filters as being analogous to traditional bass and treble tone controls.  Their impact is easily heard, which is the entire point of using them- to shape the general tonal balance of the recording.   

In contrast, the two narrow notches are 'forensic' type corrections which should not be heard.  They are fine-tuned filters specifically addressing some resonance or noise problem (perhaps minor).  Because they are narrow notches only affecting a very narrow frequency range, their tonal impact will be minimal, yet to minimize the problem without overly affecting the surrounding frequency range they need to be set much more carefully. (Geek note- see how the second notched frequency is almost exactly twice that of the first? That's indicative of a harmonic series, which is common to hums and resonances - think of a 60Hz power hum also manifesting at the next harmonic interval of 120Hz.  This harmonic series is the same aspect that produces the timbre qualities of the sound of an instrument, and is why a 440Hz middle 'C' played on different instruments sounds different and rich on each one, and contains rich harmonic content above 440Hz, rather than sounding like a straight 440Hz sine wave)

General tone shaping is far easier to wrap your head around and where I suggest you focus your initial exploration into EQ.  You'll get the most productive return from that.  Forget the forensic narrow notch stuff unless you really have a specific annoying problem you want to try to fix.  Tone shaping is generally far more fun and rewarding, making "mediocre" or "good" recordings better, rather than trying to hide problems without creating more problems.

Here's one unfortunate complication- tone shaping requires more truthful monitoring than forensic EQ correction does.  That's because tone shaping is meant to be heard and will be by everyone who listens.  Forensic correction is not intended to be heard and is ideally only heard by the editor setting it up, it is ideally only heard by the end user via its absence.

« Last Edit: October 19, 2017, 02:25:46 PM by Gutbucket »
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Offline Sloan Simpson

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #14 on: October 19, 2017, 01:11:40 PM »
In general EQ can be divided into to general categories- general tone shaping on one hand, and reducing the impact of specific problems on the other.   They are quite different from each other in the way one approaches them and what they sound like (or intentionally don't sound like). 

The screen shot image of the curve your recording acquaintance sent you indicates he used both approaches- the broad rise in the low frequency area is tonal shaping produced via a broad shelf-filter which effects everything below about 600Hz or so.   Think of shelf filters as being analogous to traditional bass and treble tone controls.  Their impact is easily heard, which is the entire point of using them- to shape the general tonal balance of the recording.   

In contrast, the two narrow notches are 'forensic' type corrections which should not be heard.  They are fine-tuned filters specifically addressing some resonance or noise problem (perhaps minor).  Because they are narrow notches only affecting a very narrow frequency range, their tonal impact will be minimal, yet to minimize the problem without overly affecting the surrounding frequency range they need to be set much more carefully. (Geek note- see how the second notched frequency is almost exactly twice that of the first? That's indicative of a harmonic series, which is common to hums and resonances - think of a 60Hz power hum also manifesting at the next harmonic interval of 120Hz.  This harmonic series is the same aspect that produces the timbre qualities of the sound of an instrument, and is why a 440Hz middle 'C' played on different instruments sounds different and rich on each one, rather than like the same 440Hz sine wave from all of them)

General tone shaping is far easier to wrap your head around and where I suggest you focus your initial exploration into EQ.  You'll get the most productive return from that.  Forget the forensic narrow notch stuff unless you really have a specific annoying problem you want to try to fix.  Tone shaping is generally far more fun and rewarding, making "mediocre" or "good" recordings better, rather than trying to hide problems without creating more problems.

Here's one unfortunate complication- tone shaping requires more truthful monitoring than forensic EQ correction does.  That's because tone shaping is meant to be heard and will be by everyone who listens.  Forensic correction is not intended to be heard and is ideally only heard by the editor setting it up, it is ideally only heard by the end user via its absence.
Fantastic post, thank you
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Offline Gutbucket

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #15 on: October 19, 2017, 01:22:24 PM »
Parametric EQ's offer more control for the advanced user, and are really the only choice for the narrow forensic correction stuff, yet I'd suggest playing around with a graphic EQ first (the kind with little vertical sliders for a range of frequencies) which I think will be more productive for you for tonal shaping, at least at first.

That's because I feel you can train your ear and develop a better sense of what's going by pushing the sliders around and immediately hearing the resulting changes.  Make smooth, broad curves which emulate shelf filter type curves.  You can then go through the spectrum adjusting each slider to hear the difference even a  slight adjustment in only one small region of the curve makes, and how the overall steepness and smoothness of the curves you make affect the sound.

Parametric EQs can of course be set to make broad tonal changes (low Q filters) instead of narrow, targeted corrections (high Q filters), but fine-tuning the specific shape of the curve and hearing just that specific adjustment is not as direct.  The shape of the entire curve changes.  More later, gotta go..

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Offline chk

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #16 on: October 19, 2017, 04:04:03 PM »
Parametric Eq's are the best IMO. Obviously the world has uses for graphic and such, but when I did FOH and live PA sound, the discovery of parametric EQ's (Ashley, then Meyer Sound) was one of the best tools I ever found. This was in the big bad analog era (1980's) so now with the digital and software age these tools have become miniaturized and the software ones are more affordable compared to their hardware brothers ans sisters.

this Massenburg one looks nice, anyone know of others and/or relative costs of them? (i.e. I am interested in the Ozone software for my processing and am still not committed to any platform yet)

I like the Tokyo Dawn plug ins. Their EQs (Nova and slick) work well and are built around transparency, though do have the ability to add some warmth if you so choose.
http://www.tokyodawn.net/tokyo-dawn-labs/

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #17 on: October 19, 2017, 04:04:48 PM »
The TDR plugin standard versions are free

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #18 on: October 19, 2017, 04:15:17 PM »
I'm using FabFilter Pro-Q 2 for surgical EQ. It's not cheap but I like the interface quite a bit. I use FabFilter Pro-MB for tonal shaping and can't recommend it strongly enough.
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Offline Gutbucket

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #19 on: October 19, 2017, 04:22:21 PM »
Clarifying my previous statement a bit-

A simple parametric EQ can be used just like a bass, midrange, and treble tone control on an old receiver.  In that way it's easy to understand.  Just turn a knob for more or less bass or treble.  It's the adjustment provided by the other knobs and achieving more complex curve shapes which make using one more complicated. 

But somewhat more complex (yet not overly complex) curves are generally called for when doing tonal type mastering EQ, which is pretty much the main focus of the EQ work we are doing to our live music stereo recordings.  That's because in mastering were dealing with a complex acoustic mix of the sounds of all instruments combined with the ambience of the room.  In contrast, simpler curves can work fine for tonally EQing individual instrument channels intended for mixing, where that EQ adjustment is only affecting one instrument's sound.

So for really learning one's way around tonal EQ for mastering, I think is is easier to home-in on whatever specific shaped tonal corrections are appropriate for each individual recording using a graphic EQ, because it makes it easier to tweak smaller portions the of the larger broad curve in a straightforward way, without also affecting other areas that aren't of immediate interest, and immediately hear that change as you make it.

Start by making broad curves which target the general tonal quality you want- shelf-filter shapes which bring up or reduce the bass and/or treble, and/or broad (low Q) curves targeting the upper or lower midrange.  This part is actually slightly easier with a parametric EQ where you just turn a knob or two to make that kind of smooth, broad curve, whereas with a graphic EQ you need to move a number of sliders and position them next to one anther to approximate a smooth curve.  The next step is the key to why I suggest playing around with a graphic EQ first- Making small adjustments to refine the shape of the large curves while keeping a relatively smooth overall shape as much as possible. You can modify the shape of the curve slope slightly, make it slightly more or less peaky at the highest point, carve out a bit more or less from the "side of the hill", add or subtract a dB or two around specific frequency or whatever while getting audible feedback of just that change while you make it.  Playing around with slight adjustments to smooth out the curves in various ways is a key aspect to getting good tone shaping with a graphic EQ.  It is perhaps ironic that we are doing tonal-shaping EQ here, yet these seemingly small slider adjustments to individual portions of the broad curve will be easily audible.  (See the end note on this message which plays directly into this)

You can do something similar with a parametric EQ by first making the broad curve, then activating additional narrower range filters which further modify the shape of the first one.  That's how most professional mastering engineers would go about it.  But that's a more abstract way of working and does not really provide the same kind of direct finger-movement-to-ear-reaction targeted feedback loop for the changes your are making.  Without overlaying multiple parametric filters that way, the individual parametric curves are always symmetrical.  IMO, you have to already have a trained ear and know your way around the EQ to work productively that way, whereas you can sort of home in on things in a more iterative way using a graphic EQ and going up and down the curve making small adjustments.  That's why I feel its a better basis for leaning what to do, providing a more direct connection between the specific small change made and the audible change heard.

For very top quality, parametric software EQs have potential to sound better.  Sound guys are used to them- each channel strip EQ on a soundboard usually has high and low shelf filters and a parametric Mid filter, sometimes two of them.  But software certainly makes for far better sounding cheap or free graphic EQs than the cheap consumer analog graphic EQs of decades back, and I don't have much problem with the sound of most of them used wisely.  Key phrase being used wisely.  Keep your ears open.  If it starts to sound weird bad back off and try again.  The main thing is to learn how to use them to avoid outright pilot error.  It's easy to get lost in concentration listening to EQ adjustments until you loose the big picture and begin to overlook the forest for the trees.  Or to be that guy that EQs things to sound great on his (less than linear) playback system, such that it sounds terrible everywhere else.

Standard EQ advice- Alternate listening to the corrected and uncorrected version.  Compare against a similar recording you know sounds correct.  Ask Sarge if it sounds right to her when she sticks her head in, make a mental note to pack it up and try again later if she high-tails it out of the room. Take a break and listen later with fresh ears.  Sometimes its surprising how far off track we can get without realizing it.  Listen on other systems.  EQing for tone is highly dependent on the accuracy of your monitoring (or at least being very familiar with it's deficiencies, which is why comparison against a known good sounding reference recording of similar material played through the same system is a good idea) and the effects of listening fatigue.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2017, 04:24:16 PM by Gutbucket »
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Offline Gutbucket

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #20 on: October 19, 2017, 05:20:27 PM »
More tips-

Find a general approximate broad curve shape for the entire frequency range first, then refine that more specific region by region.  Broad changes in distant portions of the spectrum will change the specifics elsewhere.  Revisit what you think you got just right.  It's probably not just right anymore if you've made changes elsewhere.

In general I think broadly of tonal EQ in terms of thee or four general frequency regions. To get the overall bass, mid and treble regions sounding correct, you may need to smoothly sculpt some stuff out between between those regions.

Lets see, in circumspect, I generally think of a bass region (~<200Hz), upper midrange (say 1kHz to ~6kHz), top end (~>10kHz), and upper bass/lower midrange (~200Hz to 600Hz).  I might have something of a broad curve through a few of those areas and work on appropriate transitions between them.  I might need to address more narrow categories within those regions, such as in the bass or upper midrange.

Sometimes the mid and top end has mic response resonances and addressing them begins to cross the line from tonal EQ toward more targeted forensic EQ.  If hunting to reduce an offending region, find it and pull it down (we can discuss how to find them), then boost a bit on either side of to restore the naturalness of the surrounding spectrum.  Play with that push-and-pull aspect of the surrounding frequency range to find a reasonable balance.  This works for both boosting and cutting.

Somewhat more 4060 specific, since you use them frequently, although I'm loath to specify anything too specifically-
Try a smooth curve which boosts the upper midrange helping clarity as that seems to improve the presence range of most omnis, drop it down somewhere around 12kHz to cut stridency, then boost the higher treble range to restore the air and brilliance otherwise lost to the depth of the ~12k cut.  Likewise at the bottom, for acoustic non-PA amplified material like you frequently record, some boost to the very bottom (even with the flat omnis) along with a slight scoop to the sometimes muddy 200 - 500Hz range can clean up and reinforces the low end.  That kind of gentle alternation of boosted and cut areas often works well.  When you find a trend like that you like identify it.  Then work on smoothing it out and reducing it until it still works audibly, yet is less intrusive.  This can be poo-poo'd as little more than making and advanced simile-shaped EQ curve (more of a lopsided 'W') but is something of a general trend. 

Be careful cutting that "sometimes muddy" upper bass/lower-mid range, it can be tempting to cut there to let the lower bass bloom and enhance clarity of the stuff above, but much of the power and energy of the music lives there, especially classical music.  The complication is that this is also where a lot of room acoustic issues lurk, which is why that region can sometime sound cluttered or muddy.  Listen carefully and don't just cut it by rote, which is basically what a Bose system does.

Oh, and don't get overly wedded to the visual feedback of the position of the sliders or the shape of a displayed EQ curve, ears don't see, ears are what mater, do whatever your ears say is good, as confirmed by other,  rested and trusted ears.

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Offline Moke

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #21 on: October 19, 2017, 05:43:55 PM »
Indebted.
Many thanks, Lee, and, all!

What I realized last night in toying around with about 30 seconds of highlighted track,.. is that I can use this to help bolster my Senn MKE2002 low-end.  They are a beautiful sounding acoustic recording mic, w/ slight exception to their bass roll-off characteristic.   But, if the bottom end can be boosted safely, without too much futzing around, I can see where this is a big help.

alright, more absorbing of an avalanche of information to go yet. Probably a ton of questions not yet thought.

Actually, one more immediate question:
At the furthest knob to the left in the original EQ image, at 165hz, am I seeing an HPF slope of 12dB per octave?
If not, what is the significance of that setting?

OK,.. for now,... readying for a classical guitar duet recital this evening.  yummy.
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Offline jefflester

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #22 on: October 19, 2017, 06:13:26 PM »
Actually, one more immediate question:
At the furthest knob to the left in the original EQ image, at 165hz, am I seeing an HPF slope of 12dB per octave?
If not, what is the significance of that setting?
It's turned off ("Out" button rather than "In"), so I don't think there is any significance to that setting. If it were in, it would be rolling off the bass, counteracting the 8.5 dB shelf at the lowest frequencies.
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Offline Moke

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Re: EQ Help,.. please and thanks. clueless is I
« Reply #23 on: October 19, 2017, 06:36:28 PM »
thanks. That was forefront in my thinking, and confusing the heck out of me; but, this is all new at this point.
thanks again.
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