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Author Topic: What sample rate are you using?  (Read 6621 times)

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Offline nak700s

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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #75 on: June 28, 2018, 07:14:56 PM »
Good question.  The previous, but in practical terms the answer becomes "both".

Generally its a good idea to set gain for each pair individually at the start of recording, then re-adjust as appropriate during mixing.

When mixing, I always balance levels and make correction tweaks by ear anyway.  That's a critical part of my post processing, even more so when mixing multiple channels, where I balance each pair separately before balancing the mix of pairs.  So in that sense I'm not overly concerned with the particular level relationship between multiple channels while recording since I'm going to adjust things by ear later.  From that perspective I'm setting gains so as to maximize dynamics for each channel individually while recording.

But..

Once the show gets rolling and I have the recording gains pretty much dialed in where I want them, at that point I don't want to make gain changes to individual channels because doing so would throw off whatever delicate mix balance I reach afterwards, from that particular point on in the performance.  So once I dial in whatever recording gains I feel are appropriate for each channel, I link the gain controls across all recording channels so that I can adjust them all simultaneously.  That way if I need to reduce levels for any one channel I adjust the gain of all of them together using one knob.  I hopefully don't need to do that during any one set, but often do between sets for multiple artist acts, such as at a festival.  Then whenever I do adjust gains during recording, the level change is obvious in post and I can locate and compensate for that for all channels across the board (adjusting them all by the same amount), without throwing off my mix balance.

Since I'm personally recording six or sometimes more channels, all of which are part of a multiple microphone array where each channel has a specific relationship to the others, including a tightly-correlated 3-microphone "center pair", doing this becomes even more important than it does when managing four channels.

It's sort of like the ambisonic case described above, except I don't need to precisely match identical recording gain across all channels.  I only need to keep the relative gain between channels the same throughout the recording.

Keeping the relative gains the same is a practicality of mixing thing.

I'll occasionally check the lowest level channels, typically rearward facing "ambience" channels, to make sure the signal remains above the noise floor of my recording system during the quietest parts.  If it does, no worries.

OK, I completely agree with what you said...especially when running more that 4 mics, with a "center".  I often run 5 mics (or 3 mics with a board patch - still 5 channels), and the blend(s) mic(s) can really throw things off.

Since I'm not concerned with a balanced mix of all tracks, not being concerned with everything being equal when recording.  I will, more often than not, lean heavier in one direction, depending on the sound of the tracks.  (eg. 60/40...75/25...55/50...)

What I was really getting at though, is when recording each source, knowing that you'll have to lower your levels before blending the sources, do you tend to set your levels lower than if recording 2 tracks, or record as if they're separate sources?
Normal: Nakamichi CM-700's >> SD 744T (or) Sony PCM-M10
Normal: Crown CM-700's >> SD 302 >> SD 744T
Fun times: 3 Crown CM-700's >> SD 302 >> SD744T + 2 Nakamichi CM-700's >> SD744T
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Offline Gutbucket

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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #76 on: June 29, 2018, 10:05:30 AM »
I record them as if separate sources.
Mix them by ear.
Adjust output level by eye.

In other words-
I record optimizing recording gains for each.  Import the files and adjust the relative levels of those sources in the mixing software by ear, listening for whatever sounds best and works right (sometimes going back and forth between a few different "good" choices before making a decision, but never by any specific ratio or dB difference), and adjust the resulting level in the mix bus by eye, checking the peak-hold meter so that the highest peak ends up around -.5 dBfs or so.

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Offline Gutbucket

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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #77 on: June 29, 2018, 10:15:23 AM »
I'm always wonder a bit when folks state specific mix ratios between sources here at TS.  How do you know what the ratio is? I can't imagine folks are doing RMS ratio calculations to determine what the ratio might be. Is there some "combine" function of specific mixing software that specifies this? 

If so, unless the separate sources had exactly the same levels prior to mixing, any level difference between the files would be invisible to the mixing software (unless the software was pretty advanced).  It's basically the same situation as the Mid/Side ratio thing I described earlier in the thread - the Mid/Side controller assumes the Mid and Side channels were recorded with equal sensitivity microphones and recording gains, and if that's not the case the ratio displayed on the controller display is not the actual ratio.

A dB difference between sources would seem to me easier to determine and more useful (being a logarithmic rather than a linear relationship) if one wanted to describe the relationship between sources to someone else, just get a numeric "feel" for a specific level difference, or determine how much difference is in play before one source effectively renders the other inaudible.
musical volition > vibrations > voltages > numeric values > voltages > vibrations> virtual teleportation time-machine experience
Better recording made easy - >>Improved PAS table<< | Made excellent- >>click here to download the Oddball Microphone Technique illustrated PDF booklet<<

Offline nak700s

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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #78 on: June 29, 2018, 11:15:50 AM »
I'm always wonder a bit when folks state specific mix ratios between sources here at TS.  How do you know what the ratio is? I can't imagine folks are doing RMS ratio calculations to determine what the ratio might be. Is there some "combine" function of specific mixing software that specifies this? 

If so, unless the separate sources had exactly the same levels prior to mixing, any level difference between the files would be invisible to the mixing software (unless the software was pretty advanced).  It's basically the same situation as the Mid/Side ratio thing I described earlier in the thread - the Mid/Side controller assumes the Mid and Side channels were recorded with equal sensitivity microphones and recording gains, and if that's not the case the ratio displayed on the controller display is not the actual ratio.

A dB difference between sources would seem to me easier to determine and more useful (being a logarithmic rather than a linear relationship) if one wanted to describe the relationship between sources to someone else, just get a numeric "feel" for a specific level difference, or determine how much difference is in play before one source effectively renders the other inaudible.

"I record them as if separate sources.
Mix them by ear.
Adjust output level by eye.

In other words-
I record optimizing recording gains for each.  Import the files and adjust the relative levels of those sources in the mixing software by ear, listening for whatever sounds best and works right (sometimes going back and forth between a few different "good" choices before making a decision, but never by any specific ratio or dB difference), and adjust the resulting level in the mix bus by eye, checking the peak-hold meter so that the highest peak ends up around -.5 dBfs or so."


OK, I am clearly not articulating myself well on this topic.  My apologies for all the confusion.

I essentially do the same thing you do...as stated above.

My original question was only relating to your original recording levels, which you did answer.  As you are aware, when recording multi tracks, and then combining them, they increase which can then create a handful of peaks.  If, when recording the live source, you lower your levels based on what you'd normally record at, then you'd be raising your levels in post if they are not already the way you like them once you mix tracks.  When recording as you normally would with two tracks, levels will have to be lowered before mixing tracks.  My question was based on that.  After getting the swing of multi-track recording, I lowered my original recording levels by about 3dB in anticipation of post production.  I've never had a problem with this (yet).  In other cases, when I want the different microphone sources to also shine on their own, I will record as in they are pairs only, and end up having to lower the levels in post.

The ratios a I sighted were bullshit and I shouldn't have stated them that way, I just thought for the sake of simplification, it would best describe what I was trying to say.  I was obviously incorrect.  My sources usually differ from being the same to a 3-4 dB difference (before mixing, in order to attain the sound I like best).  That is to say, If one pair of mics are Naks and the other pair are Gefells, when mixing, I will determine what I need more in the mix (by ear), and adjust accordingly.  If I remember correctly, my most recent 4-track recording ended up at a 2dB difference between the two source pair of mics.  Naks are warmer and provide a more resonating bottom end, while the Gefells offer a crisp, more precise high end.  They blend nicely, but it's a matter of preference what your ear may prefer.

I hope that helps clarify what I meant to say.

Normal: Nakamichi CM-700's >> SD 744T (or) Sony PCM-M10
Normal: Crown CM-700's >> SD 302 >> SD 744T
Fun times: 3 Crown CM-700's >> SD 302 >> SD744T + 2 Nakamichi CM-700's >> SD744T
Stealth: CA-14c >> CA 9200 >> Edirol R-09HR
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Offline noahbickart

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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #79 on: June 29, 2018, 03:25:54 PM »
I lowered my original recording levels by about 3dB in anticipation of post production.  I've never had a problem with this (yet). 

Indeed, as you articulate, combining two (roughly identical) sources results in a 3db increase in level. That's because the decibel is a unit of measurement used to express the ratio of one value of a physical property to another on a logarithmic scale. So, when you reduce two inputs which will eventually be combined by 3db, you are compensating for this doubling. Or, to say it differently, if you combine two identical tracks, you increase the level by 3db.

However, I don't see any benefit whatsoever in reducing levels while recording, and advise you do it differently. You'd be much better off in trying to get as close to 0 without going over on every channel as you do when you run only two channels. Then, using a DAW, reduce the level of individual channels in post to taste when mixing. Start with each track at -3db and go from there, and put a brick wall limiter at -.01 db, as the last plugin.

Gutbucket (or others)...

I'm interested in what you would do, with regards to levels, when recording 4 tracks (say, 2 from a soundboard and 2 from microphones...or 2 different pair of microphones).  Would you still "saturate" as much as possible without going over, and lower the levels in post before combining, or would you record a little lower to make post easier?

I'd put it this way:
lower the levels in post while combining

« Last Edit: June 29, 2018, 03:30:08 PM by noahbickart »
Recording:
Capsules: Schoeps mk41v (x2), mk4v (x2), mk22 (x2), mk3 (x2), mk21 & mk8
Cables: 2x nbob KCY, 1 pair nbob actives, Darktrain 2 and 4 channel KCY extensions:
Preamps:    Schoeps VMS 02iub, Naiant Littlebox, Naiant IPA, Sound Devices Mixpre6
Recorders: Sound Devices Mixpre6, Sony PCM m10

Home Playback: Mytek DSD 192> McIntosh MC162> Eminent Tech LFT-16; Musical Fidelity xCan v2> Hifiman HE-4XX / Beyerdynamic DT880

Office Playback: Grace m903> AKG k701 / Hifiman HE-400

Offline Gutbucket

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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #80 on: June 29, 2018, 03:30:45 PM »
Was typing this as Noah posted, which basically states the same less concisely..

As you are aware, when recording multi tracks, and then combining them, they increase which can then create a handful of peaks.  If, when recording the live source, you lower your levels based on what you'd normally record at, then you'd be raising your levels in post if they are not already the way you like them once you mix tracks.  When recording as you normally would with two tracks, levels will have to be lowered before mixing tracks.  My question was based on that.  After getting the swing of multi-track recording, I lowered my original recording levels by about 3dB in anticipation of post production.  I've never had a problem with this (yet).  In other cases, when I want the different microphone sources to also shine on their own, I will record as in they are pairs only, and end up having to lower the levels in post.

There is no need to record the source files which are likely to be mixed together later at a lower level.  The editing software should provide multiple points of gain adjustment.  Like an analog mixing console which a digital multichannel editor emulates, one can adjust gain of the individual tracks/input channels as well as the output level from the mix bus. The mix relationship is controlled by the relative gains applied at the individual track/channel level, and the output level controlled by the gain of the mix bus.  One can also control the levels through the mix bus by collectively lowering the gain of all individual tracks/channels by equal amounts, but it's easier to do so with the mix bus output gain control.

A well designed analog mixing console provides sufficient summing headroom through the mix bus to accommodate the increase in level that arises from the combination of individual channels.  One needs to keep each input channel from clipping, and as long as that is the case there should be sufficient headroom internally to mix all channels together without clipping. Then the gain through the mix bus output amplifier can be adjusted so that it does not clip and whatever it is feeding doesn not clip.

In a digital multitrack editor, the internal calculations are typically done with 32 bit floating point mathematical precision. That provides "mathematical headroom" somewhat analogous to the voltage headroom inside a well designed analog console.  You need to get the signal into the editor without going over and out of the editor without going over, but within the editor itself the calculation space is large enough to provide sufficient headroom until dithered and truncated down to a lower bit depth output file
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Better recording made easy - >>Improved PAS table<< | Made excellent- >>click here to download the Oddball Microphone Technique illustrated PDF booklet<<

Offline Gutbucket

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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #81 on: June 29, 2018, 04:16:35 PM »
combining two (roughly identical) sources results in a 3db increase in level.

This is generally true for mixing in practice, within a few constraints- First the two sources need to have close to the same level to begin with.  If one source has a significantly higher level than the other, the sum of the two will not have a significantly higher level than the higher level source.  For mix combinations where the levels of the two sources are not quite identical but close enough that the combination is musically meaningful (you can hear the contribution of the lower level source) the sum will be less.

Assuming the two sources are exactly same level prior to summing and have a positive phase correlation..

If the sources are incoherent the sum is +3dB
If the sources are coherent the sum is +6dB

Most sources we will be mixing together will be have a coherence somewhere in between those extremes yet closer to incoherent than coherent, so the sum will generally be much closer to +3dB than +6db.

Coherent means the signals completely identical in content and phase.
Incoherent means a randomized phase relationship between the signals. 

Good examples of primarily-incoherent signals are those from microphones spaced far enough apart, or directional microphones pointing far enough away from each other, or both.  An AUD and a SBD will be predominantly incoherent as the sources are sampled from different physical locations.  A good example of full coherence would be summing a source with a copy of itself.

If the sources have a negative phase correlation the resulting level of the sum is reduced not increased.  Consider the polarity of once source flipped with respect to the other.  In that case the sum of the same two incoherent sources will be -3dB instead of +3dB.  And the sum of two fully coherent signals, say a source and its polarity inverted copy, will be...   a mathematical null (-∞dB), but in the real world a quite low but not infinitely attenuated level.  Because mathmatics is absolute but the real world is fuzzy.

« Last Edit: June 29, 2018, 04:22:43 PM by Gutbucket »
musical volition > vibrations > voltages > numeric values > voltages > vibrations> virtual teleportation time-machine experience
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Offline nak700s

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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #82 on: June 29, 2018, 04:26:08 PM »
I lowered my original recording levels by about 3dB in anticipation of post production.  I've never had a problem with this (yet). 

Indeed, as you articulate, combining two (roughly identical) sources results in a 3db increase in level. That's because the decibel is a unit of measurement used to express the ratio of one value of a physical property to another on a logarithmic scale. So, when you reduce two inputs which will eventually be combined by 3db, you are compensating for this doubling. Or, to say it differently, if you combine two identical tracks, you increase the level by 3db.

However, I don't see any benefit whatsoever in reducing levels while recording, and advise you do it differently. You'd be much better off in trying to get as close to 0 without going over on every channel as you do when you run only two channels. Then, using a DAW, reduce the level of individual channels in post to taste when mixing. Start with each track at -3db and go from there, and put a brick wall limiter at -.01 db, as the last plugin.

Gutbucket (or others)...

I'm interested in what you would do, with regards to levels, when recording 4 tracks (say, 2 from a soundboard and 2 from microphones...or 2 different pair of microphones).  Would you still "saturate" as much as possible without going over, and lower the levels in post before combining, or would you record a little lower to make post easier?

I'd put it this way:
lower the levels in post while combining

Yes Noah, this is basically what I was thinking.  After running a couple of 4 tracks, I liked having the "individual pairs" nicely recorded.  Dropping them down a few dB in post is no big deal.  I was just interested in what others did...

At the Citi Field shows, I was FOB with Jon and took a digital line out of his 722/Gefells while also running my Naks.  As anticipated, they played very nicely together.  If I could ever figure out how to post a damn show on bt.etree, I would like to put them out there.
Normal: Nakamichi CM-700's >> SD 744T (or) Sony PCM-M10
Normal: Crown CM-700's >> SD 302 >> SD 744T
Fun times: 3 Crown CM-700's >> SD 302 >> SD744T + 2 Nakamichi CM-700's >> SD744T
Stealth: CA-14c >> CA 9200 >> Edirol R-09HR
Ultra stealth: AudioReality >> AudioReality battery box >> Edirol R-09HR
Simple & Sweet!

Offline noahbickart

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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #83 on: June 30, 2018, 10:08:14 PM »
I lowered my original recording levels by about 3dB in anticipation of post production.  I've never had a problem with this (yet). 

Indeed, as you articulate, combining two (roughly identical) sources results in a 3db increase in level. That's because the decibel is a unit of measurement used to express the ratio of one value of a physical property to another on a logarithmic scale. So, when you reduce two inputs which will eventually be combined by 3db, you are compensating for this doubling. Or, to say it differently, if you combine two identical tracks, you increase the level by 3db.

However, I don't see any benefit whatsoever in reducing levels while recording, and advise you do it differently. You'd be much better off in trying to get as close to 0 without going over on every channel as you do when you run only two channels. Then, using a DAW, reduce the level of individual channels in post to taste when mixing. Start with each track at -3db and go from there, and put a brick wall limiter at -.01 db, as the last plugin.

Gutbucket (or others)...

I'm interested in what you would do, with regards to levels, when recording 4 tracks (say, 2 from a soundboard and 2 from microphones...or 2 different pair of microphones).  Would you still "saturate" as much as possible without going over, and lower the levels in post before combining, or would you record a little lower to make post easier?

I'd put it this way:
lower the levels in post while combining

Yes Noah, this is basically what I was thinking.  After running a couple of 4 tracks, I liked having the "individual pairs" nicely recorded.  Dropping them down a few dB in post is no big deal.  I was just interested in what others did...

At the Citi Field shows, I was FOB with Jon and took a digital line out of his 722/Gefells while also running my Naks.  As anticipated, they played very nicely together.  If I could ever figure out how to post a damn show on bt.etree, I would like to put them out there.

I’d be happy to walk you through it at some point, get in touch.
Recording:
Capsules: Schoeps mk41v (x2), mk4v (x2), mk22 (x2), mk3 (x2), mk21 & mk8
Cables: 2x nbob KCY, 1 pair nbob actives, Darktrain 2 and 4 channel KCY extensions:
Preamps:    Schoeps VMS 02iub, Naiant Littlebox, Naiant IPA, Sound Devices Mixpre6
Recorders: Sound Devices Mixpre6, Sony PCM m10

Home Playback: Mytek DSD 192> McIntosh MC162> Eminent Tech LFT-16; Musical Fidelity xCan v2> Hifiman HE-4XX / Beyerdynamic DT880

Office Playback: Grace m903> AKG k701 / Hifiman HE-400

Offline nak700s

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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #84 on: July 02, 2018, 01:49:05 PM »
Quote from: noahbickart link=topic=186648.msg2269858#msg2269858 date=1530410894[/quote

I’d be happy to walk you through it at some point, get in touch.

LOL, my friend, I need more than a walk through!  I need a "Posting For Dummies" printout...  I sat in with my friend Joe (not sure if you know him, but he goes by Joe Beacon).  He went through it with me step by step, and I wrote it all down.  I think I was able to get it to work once.  I think.  I may have a different version than him for something, but all it does is stress me out.  If you feel like dealing with it, and want to write out a step by step (taking nothing for granted), I'm a creature of habit and would follow the directions verbatim, and start posting lots of goodies.  I would only post to bt.etree, just so you know.  When I want something posted, I give it to Joe, but don't always like to ask because he has enough of his own stuff to deal with, so mine often doesn't get posted.
Normal: Nakamichi CM-700's >> SD 744T (or) Sony PCM-M10
Normal: Crown CM-700's >> SD 302 >> SD 744T
Fun times: 3 Crown CM-700's >> SD 302 >> SD744T + 2 Nakamichi CM-700's >> SD744T
Stealth: CA-14c >> CA 9200 >> Edirol R-09HR
Ultra stealth: AudioReality >> AudioReality battery box >> Edirol R-09HR
Simple & Sweet!

Offline noahbickart

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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #85 on: July 02, 2018, 03:31:50 PM »
Quote from: noahbickart link=topic=186648.msg2269858#msg2269858 date=1530410894[/quote

I’d be happy to walk you through it at some point, get in touch.

LOL, my friend, I need more than a walk through!  I need a "Posting For Dummies" printout...  I sat in with my friend Joe (not sure if you know him, but he goes by Joe Beacon).  He went through it with me step by step, and I wrote it all down.  I think I was able to get it to work once.  I think.  I may have a different version than him for something, but all it does is stress me out.  If you feel like dealing with it, and want to write out a step by step (taking nothing for granted), I'm a creature of habit and would follow the directions verbatim, and start posting lots of goodies.  I would only post to bt.etree, just so you know.  When I want something posted, I give it to Joe, but don't always like to ask because he has enough of his own stuff to deal with, so mine often doesn't get posted.

Well, I teach people how to understand the Talmud for a living, and I guarantee that bt.etree.org is less obtuse than the Babylonian Talmud....
Recording:
Capsules: Schoeps mk41v (x2), mk4v (x2), mk22 (x2), mk3 (x2), mk21 & mk8
Cables: 2x nbob KCY, 1 pair nbob actives, Darktrain 2 and 4 channel KCY extensions:
Preamps:    Schoeps VMS 02iub, Naiant Littlebox, Naiant IPA, Sound Devices Mixpre6
Recorders: Sound Devices Mixpre6, Sony PCM m10

Home Playback: Mytek DSD 192> McIntosh MC162> Eminent Tech LFT-16; Musical Fidelity xCan v2> Hifiman HE-4XX / Beyerdynamic DT880

Office Playback: Grace m903> AKG k701 / Hifiman HE-400

Offline nak700s

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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #86 on: July 02, 2018, 03:35:21 PM »
Quote from: noahbickart link=topic=186648.msg2269858#msg2269858 date=1530410894[/quote

I’d be happy to walk you through it at some point, get in touch.

LOL, my friend, I need more than a walk through!  I need a "Posting For Dummies" printout...  I sat in with my friend Joe (not sure if you know him, but he goes by Joe Beacon).  He went through it with me step by step, and I wrote it all down.  I think I was able to get it to work once.  I think.  I may have a different version than him for something, but all it does is stress me out.  If you feel like dealing with it, and want to write out a step by step (taking nothing for granted), I'm a creature of habit and would follow the directions verbatim, and start posting lots of goodies.  I would only post to bt.etree, just so you know.  When I want something posted, I give it to Joe, but don't always like to ask because he has enough of his own stuff to deal with, so mine often doesn't get posted.

Well, I teach people how to understand the Talmud for a living, and I guarantee that bt.etree.org is less obtuse than the Babylonian Talmud....

OK, after reading this, I cracked up laughing... people at work turned to look at me!  You may have a bit of a challenge, but I'm game if you are.
Normal: Nakamichi CM-700's >> SD 744T (or) Sony PCM-M10
Normal: Crown CM-700's >> SD 302 >> SD 744T
Fun times: 3 Crown CM-700's >> SD 302 >> SD744T + 2 Nakamichi CM-700's >> SD744T
Stealth: CA-14c >> CA 9200 >> Edirol R-09HR
Ultra stealth: AudioReality >> AudioReality battery box >> Edirol R-09HR
Simple & Sweet!

Offline Dede2002

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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #87 on: July 31, 2018, 08:44:01 PM »
Dsatz is one of the main reasons that Ts.com remains the best place on the internet.

Thanks for your continued presence here.

Same here. Dsatz posts are free humility lessons. It's one of the few opportunities in life where I feel exultant to find out how little I know.
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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #88 on: August 01, 2018, 02:02:59 PM »
LOL, my friend, I need more than a walk through!  I need a "Posting For Dummies" printout... 
Are you having trouble preparing a file set which is ready to share? Or having trouble with the uploading process on either archive.org or bitTorrent?


File set preparation is the same for either, but you would need a separate lesson for torrenting, since it's quite different than posting on the LMA.


It's not that any of the steps is that difficult, but it's a lot of ducks to get lined up in a row. It's great when you can get things to be "just so," and then have the upload work properly on the first try! The archive is much more forgiving than a torrent, in that you can change everything later. Torrents have to keep the fileset exactly as it is created in order to keep them running.

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Offline nak700s

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Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #89 on: August 02, 2018, 04:19:03 PM »
LOL, my friend, I need more than a walk through!  I need a "Posting For Dummies" printout... 
Are you having trouble preparing a file set which is ready to share? Or having trouble with the uploading process on either archive.org or bitTorrent?


File set preparation is the same for either, but you would need a separate lesson for torrenting, since it's quite different than posting on the LMA.


It's not that any of the steps is that difficult, but it's a lot of ducks to get lined up in a row. It's great when you can get things to be "just so," and then have the upload work properly on the first try! The archive is much more forgiving than a torrent, in that you can change everything later. Torrents have to keep the fileset exactly as it is created in order to keep them running.

Where do I start, LOL????

If I had my step by step list here, I'd share it with you to help me troubleshoot, but I don't.  I use TLH to create the torrent, and everything "seems" to go just fine.  Once done, I attempt to upload to bt.etree, which I believe has worked once for me.  I am a creature of habit, and follow the same directions each time, so it doesn't make sense to me that it would work once and not again.  I only want to upload to bt.etree, so I keep it simple like that.  Basically, what I need is an idiot-proof step by step of how to create the torrent and then upload it to bt.etree.  Any help would be appreciated...
Normal: Nakamichi CM-700's >> SD 744T (or) Sony PCM-M10
Normal: Crown CM-700's >> SD 302 >> SD 744T
Fun times: 3 Crown CM-700's >> SD 302 >> SD744T + 2 Nakamichi CM-700's >> SD744T
Stealth: CA-14c >> CA 9200 >> Edirol R-09HR
Ultra stealth: AudioReality >> AudioReality battery box >> Edirol R-09HR
Simple & Sweet!

 

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