Become a Site Supporter and Never see Ads again!

Author Topic: What sample rate are you using?  (Read 6708 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline u2_fly_2

  • Trade Count: (0)
  • Taperssection Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 319
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #15 on: June 03, 2018, 11:33:37 AM »
96/24 Bit and also 192/24 on a new recorder. It also has the sound option "DSD Format with 2.8 MHz" which might or might not be to any use in the future(?)
Soundprofessionals Audio Technica AT 943 (SP-CMC-8) External Stereo Microphones > SP-SPSB-10-80020
Sound Professionals Micro-mini microphone power supply with mini 12vdc battery and 24 inch hardwired output cable Soundprofessionals Batterybox >> Olympus Ls-10 Linear Recorder > 4 GB > 24 Bit / 48 Khz  > 24 Bit / 96 Khz

Roland R-26 (96 / 24 Bit)

Sony PCM-D100 (192 / 24 Bit)

Offline Scooter123

  • "I am not an alcoholic. I am a drunk. Drunks don't go to meetings."
  • Trade Count: (9)
  • Taperssection Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 922
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #16 on: June 03, 2018, 12:13:30 PM »
24 48

Regards,

Scooter123

mk41 > N Box  > Sony M-10
mk4 > N Box > Sony M-10

Offline jagraham

  • Trade Count: (20)
  • Needs to get out more...
  • *****
  • Posts: 2775
  • Gender: Male
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #17 on: June 03, 2018, 12:35:38 PM »
24/48 for the recording, mastering and archiving, dithered down to 16/44.1 for flac filesets for listening purposes. Of course I always keep the edited 24bit files along with the cue files so I could track them out in 24 later.
Mics: Nak CM-300s, Nak CM-100s, CP-1s, CP-2s, AT-853s(Cards, Hypers, Omnis) CA-14s(Cards, Omnis)
Pres: CA STC-9200, CA-UBB
Recorders: Tascam DR-70D, DR-2D, Edirol R-09

ISO: 1 Teac ME-120, CP-3 Caps, AT-853 Subcard Caps

Offline capnhook

  • All your llamas are belong to us....
  • Site Supporter
  • Trade Count: (20)
  • Needs to get out more...
  • *
  • Posts: 3707
  • All your llamas are belong to us....
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #18 on: June 03, 2018, 12:57:32 PM »
I guess I'll be the odd man out and say I only do 16/44 for 95% of what I record these days.




I record in 24bit to save my bacon when the levels get too hot, and I'm not watching..


I output 16/44.1 .flac when I'm finished post-processing, 100% of the time.




Proud member of the reality-based community

BSCS-L->JB-mod [NAK CM-300 (CP-3) and/or (CP-1)]->LSD2->CA CAFS-Omni->Sony ECM-907**Apogee MiniMe Rev. C->CA Ugly II->**Edirol OCM R-44->Tascam DR-22WL->Sony TCD-D8


"Don't ever take an all or nothing attitude when it comes to making a difference
and being beautiful and making the world a beautiful place through your actions.
Every little bit is registered.  Every little bit.  So be as beautiful as you can as often as you can"

"It'll never be over, 'till we learn."
 
"My dream is to get a bus and get the band and just go coast to coast. Just about everything else except music, is anti-musical.  That's it.  Music's the thing." - Jeb Puryear

Offline checht

  • Trade Count: (2)
  • Taperssection Regular
  • **
  • Posts: 205
  • Gender: Male
  • Old and in the Way
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #19 on: June 03, 2018, 01:04:01 PM »
Seems like most use 24/48. I'll likely go to 48 khz instead of 96khz, as I haven't heard any argument against.

I think I'll stay with Audacity's 32 bit depth for post. From the manual:

"Audacity uses "float" format for 32-bit recording instead of fixed integer format as normalized floating point values are quicker and easier to process on computers than fixed integer values and allow greater dynamic range to be retained even after editing. This is because intermediate signals during audio processing can have very variable values. If they all get truncated to a fixed integer format, you can't boost them back up to full scale without losing resolution (i.e. without the data becoming less representative of the original than it was before). With floating point, rounding errors during intermediate processing are negligible.
The (theoretically audible) advantage of this is that 32-bit floating point format retains the original noise floor, and does not add noise. For example, with fixed integer data, applying a compressor effect to lower the peaks by 9 dB and separately amplifying back up would cost 9 dB (or more than 2 bits) of signal to noise ratio (SNR). If done with floating point data, the SNR of the peaks remains as good as before (except that the quiet passages are 9 dB louder and so 9 dB noisier due to the noise they had in the first place).
In many cases you will be exporting to a 16-bit format (for example if you are burning to a standard audio CD, that format is by definition 16-bit 44100 Hz). The advantage of using 32-bit float to work with holds even if you have to export to a 16-bit format. Using Dither on the Quality tab of Audacity Preferences will improve the sound quality of the exported file so there are only minimal (probably non-audible) effects of downsampling from 32-bit to 16-bit."

Note the use of 'theoretically' and 'probably'.
Schoeps MSTC64g, Shure MV-88
Schoeps KCY 250/0 lg, Naiant IPA, PFA 60v
Sound Devices MP-6, Roland R-07

Offline capnhook

  • All your llamas are belong to us....
  • Site Supporter
  • Trade Count: (20)
  • Needs to get out more...
  • *
  • Posts: 3707
  • All your llamas are belong to us....
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #20 on: June 03, 2018, 01:18:03 PM »
Seems like most use 24/48. I'll likely go to 48 khz instead of 96khz, as I haven't heard any argument against.

I think I'll stay with Audacity's 32 bit depth for post. From the manual:

"Audacity uses "float" format for 32-bit recording instead of fixed integer format as normalized floating point values are quicker and easier to process on computers than fixed integer values and allow greater dynamic range to be retained even after editing. This is because intermediate signals during audio processing can have very variable values. If they all get truncated to a fixed integer format, you can't boost them back up to full scale without losing resolution (i.e. without the data becoming less representative of the original than it was before). With floating point, rounding errors during intermediate processing are negligible.
The (theoretically audible) advantage of this is that 32-bit floating point format retains the original noise floor, and does not add noise. For example, with fixed integer data, applying a compressor effect to lower the peaks by 9 dB and separately amplifying back up would cost 9 dB (or more than 2 bits) of signal to noise ratio (SNR). If done with floating point data, the SNR of the peaks remains as good as before (except that the quiet passages are 9 dB louder and so 9 dB noisier due to the noise they had in the first place).
In many cases you will be exporting to a 16-bit format (for example if you are burning to a standard audio CD, that format is by definition 16-bit 44100 Hz). The advantage of using 32-bit float to work with holds even if you have to export to a 16-bit format. Using Dither on the Quality tab of Audacity Preferences will improve the sound quality of the exported file so there are only minimal (probably non-audible) effects of downsampling from 32-bit to 16-bit."

Note the use of 'theoretically' and 'probably'.



Stick with Audacity 2.1.0 if you have to use the "Change Speed" tool.  Newer versions are broken, truncating error.  I have not examined V2.2.2, maybe someone can report on it.  V2.1.0 works perfectly, and is OK enough for me.






Proud member of the reality-based community

BSCS-L->JB-mod [NAK CM-300 (CP-3) and/or (CP-1)]->LSD2->CA CAFS-Omni->Sony ECM-907**Apogee MiniMe Rev. C->CA Ugly II->**Edirol OCM R-44->Tascam DR-22WL->Sony TCD-D8


"Don't ever take an all or nothing attitude when it comes to making a difference
and being beautiful and making the world a beautiful place through your actions.
Every little bit is registered.  Every little bit.  So be as beautiful as you can as often as you can"

"It'll never be over, 'till we learn."
 
"My dream is to get a bus and get the band and just go coast to coast. Just about everything else except music, is anti-musical.  That's it.  Music's the thing." - Jeb Puryear

Offline checht

  • Trade Count: (2)
  • Taperssection Regular
  • **
  • Posts: 205
  • Gender: Male
  • Old and in the Way
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #21 on: June 03, 2018, 05:12:03 PM »
^ Thanks!
Schoeps MSTC64g, Shure MV-88
Schoeps KCY 250/0 lg, Naiant IPA, PFA 60v
Sound Devices MP-6, Roland R-07

Offline daspyknows

  • Trade Count: (1)
  • Needs to get out more...
  • *****
  • Posts: 3390
  • Gender: Male
  • Don't ask, don't tell, don't get get caught
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #22 on: June 03, 2018, 08:15:39 PM »
24/48 for the recording, mastering and archiving, dithered down to 16/44.1 for flac filesets for listening purposes. Of course I always keep the edited 24bit files along with the cue files so I could track them out in 24 later.

same here

Offline noahbickart

  • phishrabbi
  • Site Supporter
  • Trade Count: (31)
  • Taperssection All-Star
  • *
  • Posts: 1914
  • Gender: Male
  • So now I wander over grounds of light...
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #23 on: June 03, 2018, 09:47:04 PM »
I use 24/48, and share those and 16/44.1 “mastered” versions.
Recording:
Capsules: Schoeps mk41v (x2), mk4v (x2), mk22 (x2), mk3 (x2), mk21 & mk8
Cables: 2x nbob KCY, 1 pair nbob actives, Darktrain 2 and 4 channel KCY extensions:
Preamps:    Schoeps VMS 02iub, Naiant Littlebox, Naiant IPA, Sound Devices Mixpre6
Recorders: Sound Devices Mixpre6, Sony PCM m10

Home Playback: Mytek DSD 192> McIntosh MC162> Eminent Tech LFT-16; Musical Fidelity xCan v2> Hifiman HE-4XX / Beyerdynamic DT880

Office Playback: Grace m903> AKG k701 / Hifiman HE-400

Offline nulldogmas

  • Trade Count: (3)
  • Taperssection Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 834
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #24 on: June 03, 2018, 10:16:41 PM »
24/48 for the recording, mastering and archiving, dithered down to 16/44.1 for flac filesets for listening purposes. Of course I always keep the edited 24bit files along with the cue files so I could track them out in 24 later.

same here

Yup, that.

Offline opsopcopolis

  • Trade Count: (3)
  • Taperssection All-Star
  • ****
  • Posts: 1524
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #25 on: June 03, 2018, 11:53:57 PM »
16/44.1 usually. Occasionally 24/48. I almost never use 96 or higher even in my studio work (only really orchestral stuff/entirely acoustic music) so I sure as hell ain’t using it to record two track tapes of PA mixes from the back of a room.
Mics: Berliner CM-33, CA-14 card, CA-11 card & omni, AT-853, Sony ECM-907
Recorders: Tascam DR-60D, Tascam DR-05, Sony Hi-MD

Offline ycoop

  • Trade Count: (2)
  • Taperssection Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 344
  • Gender: Male
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #26 on: June 04, 2018, 03:21:53 AM »
I guess I'll be the odd man out and say I only do 16/44 for 95% of what I record these days.




I record in 24bit to save my bacon when the levels get too hot, and I'm not watching..


I output 16/44.1 .flac when I'm finished post-processing, 100% of the time.

This is something I've wondered about. What about the extra 8 bits allows for more work in post without losing as much quality?
Mics: Avantone CK-1s, CA-14 omnis
Pres: CA9100
Recorders: DR-60d mkII, DR-22wl, DR-07

Offline aaronji

  • Site Supporter
  • Trade Count: (6)
  • Needs to get out more...
  • *
  • Posts: 2428
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #27 on: June 04, 2018, 06:48:43 AM »
This is something I've wondered about. What about the extra 8 bits allows for more work in post without losing as much quality?

A major advantage, as I understand it, is that the extra bits greatly reduce the noise introduced from quantization error during analog to digital conversion (each extra bit approximately halves the noise).  So even if the recording peaks considerably below full-scale, you can amplify it without making the quantization noise audible...

Offline yates7592

  • Trade Count: (11)
  • Taperssection Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 688
  • Gender: Male
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #28 on: June 04, 2018, 08:48:33 AM »
24/192 - storage space isn't an issue.

Offline capnhook

  • All your llamas are belong to us....
  • Site Supporter
  • Trade Count: (20)
  • Needs to get out more...
  • *
  • Posts: 3707
  • All your llamas are belong to us....
Re: What sample rate are you using?
« Reply #29 on: June 04, 2018, 12:52:08 PM »
This is something I've wondered about. What about the extra 8 bits allows for more work in post without losing as much quality?

A major advantage, as I understand it, is that the extra bits greatly reduce the noise introduced from quantization error during analog to digital conversion (each extra bit approximately halves the noise).  So even if the recording peaks considerably below full-scale, you can amplify it without making the quantization noise audible...

Precisely, thanks aaronji
Proud member of the reality-based community

BSCS-L->JB-mod [NAK CM-300 (CP-3) and/or (CP-1)]->LSD2->CA CAFS-Omni->Sony ECM-907**Apogee MiniMe Rev. C->CA Ugly II->**Edirol OCM R-44->Tascam DR-22WL->Sony TCD-D8


"Don't ever take an all or nothing attitude when it comes to making a difference
and being beautiful and making the world a beautiful place through your actions.
Every little bit is registered.  Every little bit.  So be as beautiful as you can as often as you can"

"It'll never be over, 'till we learn."
 
"My dream is to get a bus and get the band and just go coast to coast. Just about everything else except music, is anti-musical.  That's it.  Music's the thing." - Jeb Puryear

 

RSS | Mobile
Page created in 0.265 seconds with 43 queries.
© 2002-2018 Taperssection.com
Powered by SMF