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Author Topic: How to tame swaying cymbals (because of wind)?  (Read 704 times)

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Offline TheMetalist

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How to tame swaying cymbals (because of wind)?
« on: June 15, 2019, 05:05:51 PM »
I recently recorded an outdoor show when it was very windy. Because of this the overheads/cymbals bounces around on the recording. Is it possible to tame them somehow?

I know about the excellent tool 'Monomaker' which I use a lot to stop disturbing bass frequencies (mostly 100-250 Hz) from ruining a recording completely. Is there some similar tool to use on higher frequencies? Don't want to turn them to mono, just make them more focused and easier to eq. As they are now they are all over the place.

Any ideas, tips and tricks are welcome.
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Offline goodcooker

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Re: How to tame swaying cymbals (because of wind)?
« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2019, 11:14:49 PM »

Wind can create really bad phasing in the high end frequencies coming from a PA system at distance. I don't know of a way to "correct" it since you were recording it the way it was presented.

If anyone else knows a way to fix it it involves some sort of magic wand. The only thing I've ever tried was to EQ out some of the high end frequencies and/or use multiband compression but that just made it worse.
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Offline hoserama

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Re: How to tame swaying cymbals (because of wind)?
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2019, 12:03:41 AM »
I recently recorded an outdoor show when it was very windy. Because of this the overheads/cymbals bounces around on the recording. Is it possible to tame them somehow?

I know about the excellent tool 'Monomaker' which I use a lot to stop disturbing bass frequencies (mostly 100-250 Hz) from ruining a recording completely. Is there some similar tool to use on higher frequencies? Don't want to turn them to mono, just make them more focused and easier to eq. As they are now they are all over the place.

Any ideas, tips and tricks are welcome.

Izotope Ozone has the Spatializer, which lets you expand/narrow stereo width for whatever frequency range you pick. You could narrow the higher freqs with that.

That said, if it's phasing and the resulting levels change, then it'll never be truly fixed. But you might be able to smooth it a bit.
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Offline TheMetalist

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Re: How to tame swaying cymbals (because of wind)?
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2019, 03:57:41 AM »
Wind can create really bad phasing in the high end frequencies coming from a PA system at distance. I don't know of a way to "correct" it since you were recording it the way it was presented.

I was actually pretty close to the PA and I could feel the wind against my face. I didn't hear that the overheads was affected but listening to the recording some phasing is unfortunately going on. I didn't have the same problem with other bands I recorded at the same stage.
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Offline TheMetalist

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Re: How to tame swaying cymbals (because of wind)?
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2019, 06:06:56 AM »
Izotope Ozone has the Spatializer, which lets you expand/narrow stereo width for whatever frequency range you pick. You could narrow the higher freqs with that.

This sounds interesting. Googled it but I can't find out if it's available as a separate VST? Could find a connection in iZotope Ozone Imager.
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Offline if_then_else

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Re: How to tame swaying cymbals (because of wind)?
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2019, 01:24:04 PM »
Izotope Ozone has the Spatializer, which lets you expand/narrow stereo width for whatever frequency range you pick. You could narrow the higher freqs with that.

This sounds interesting. Googled it but I can't find out if it's available as a separate VST? Could find a connection in iZotope Ozone Imager.

Daft question: What's your specific issue with the cymbals? Is it really phasing or sibilance? In the latter case try a de-esser (like Fabfilter Pro DS or the free Spitfish plugin). 

Offline TheMetalist

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Re: How to tame swaying cymbals (because of wind)?
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2019, 04:27:02 PM »
Daft question: What's your specific issue with the cymbals? Is it really phasing or sibilance? In the latter case try a de-esser (like Fabfilter Pro DS or the free Spitfish plugin).

It's more like they are bouncing around.
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Offline if_then_else

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Re: How to tame swaying cymbals (because of wind)?
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2019, 12:32:43 AM »
OK. So, give one of the de-esser plugins a try. There are a couple of YT tutorials on de-essing cymbals (e.g. with the Waves or Fabfilter VSTs).

Offline TheMetalist

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Re: How to tame swaying cymbals (because of wind)?
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2019, 01:49:52 AM »
OK. So, give one of the de-esser plugins a try. There are a couple of YT tutorials on de-essing cymbals (e.g. with the Waves or Fabfilter VSTs).

Yes, I'll try that. Thanks!
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Offline if_then_else

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Re: How to tame swaying cymbals (because of wind)?
« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2019, 01:31:03 PM »
OK. So, give one of the de-esser plugins a try. There are a couple of YT tutorials on de-essing cymbals (e.g. with the Waves or Fabfilter VSTs).

Yes, I'll try that. Thanks!

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Re: How to tame swaying cymbals (because of wind)?
« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2019, 05:35:23 PM »
It's the wind moshing the sound between the stacks and your mics. Not much you can do afterwards about the resulting bloody lip than hold a cold beer to it. The phase of the high-frequency portions of the sound are being shifted about erratically.  It's not the shift itself that is the problem and wouldn't be audible if the shift remained constant, it's the erratically shifting nature of it over time.  It is audible as the shift occurs over and over again.

EQ will reduce the level of the affected frequencies.  May help make it less obvious but will alter the tonality. Desser might do so in a slightly more targeted way (as a dynamic EQ fix which only engages when level rises high enough) preserving a bit more original tone.  Altering stereo width (monoizing) the targeted frequency range could possibly help by averaging the variations between channels in that range as they are summed.  Worth a try, but don't expect miracles.  In reality I'd be surprised if you can reduce it sufficiently to make the effort worthwhile.

A targeted "wind-phasing" repair tool would require advanced DSP signal processing.  Who knows how well it would work in reality until someone does it.  I would not be surprised if Izotope has looked int it for future Rx releases. 
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