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Author Topic: Developing Photographs  (Read 1370 times)

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Offline hogan20a

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Developing Photographs
« on: October 05, 2004, 10:25:34 PM »
I'm just getting into photography and have been taking my film to costco who sends it off to kodak or something, but the pictures are kind of grainy and I don't think its the film (although maybe I need some recommendations on film to use too), I'm using Kodak 800 gold film.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated, should I try a local place over some chain store?

Thanks,
Adam

Offline MattD

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Re: Developing Photographs
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2004, 11:15:20 PM »
1) use slower film ... I liked Kodak Royal Gold 200 for pretty much everything but sports/action
2) definitely don't use a chain, unless it's Ritz or something of similar reputation
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jpschust

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Re: Developing Photographs
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2004, 09:41:56 AM »
first of all don't send your film to costco.  they have been known to be bad news in the past.

second, do you really need to shoot 800 speed film?  what kind of lighting conditions are you shooting in?


Also, I'm not a huge fan of 200 speed film.  To me it is kind of a poor compromise between 100 and 400.  I try to stick with 100, 400, 800, 1600 and i've gone above 1600 a few times when i wanted some serious grain to my shots. 

Offline hogan20a

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Re: Developing Photographs
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2004, 08:28:27 PM »

second, do you really need to shoot 800 speed film?  what kind of lighting conditions are you shooting in?

Also, I'm not a huge fan of 200 speed film.  To me it is kind of a poor compromise between 100 and 400.  I try to stick with 100, 400, 800, 1600 and i've gone above 1600 a few times when i wanted some serious grain to my shots. 

 Because I don't know what I'm doing?   :)

I'm really new to all of this, havent even taken a photography class unfortunately.  Mostly shooting stationary objects in natural light.  However, I will be photographing a concert this weekend, never been to the venue but I expect it to be dark with just stage lights no geared for a photographer, would love some suggestions about what film/speed/etc to use for this show.

Thanks,
Adam

jpschust

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Re: Developing Photographs
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2004, 10:45:57 PM »
ok, unless you are in darker weather or in dark settings you dont need to be shooting 800.  400 will be fine, and its usually cheaper too.  at the concert you may want to shoot 1600, but its gonna give you some grain.  let me suggest you going out and getting the national geographic photographers handbook (i cant remember the exact title, but its something like that).  it's a good quick primer.

 

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