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Author Topic: Equipment for demo recording and live recording  (Read 2020 times)

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Offline Dan33185

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Re: Equipment for demo recording and live recording
« Reply #15 on: June 10, 2024, 03:27:34 PM »
I guess "demo" was the wrong choice of words. What it would be is recording songs that may or may not be used for release down the road depending on how comfortable she is with how they turn out, and how comfortable she is putting her own work out there for the public. Much different performing covers than your own stuff. But, like I told her, I believe her original stuff deserves a chance to be recorded at least, even if it's just to share among family and friends, and if she decides to do a small CD pressing later, great. I had forgotten that she has a "she-shed" type building, which is maybe 15x15 that works as her art studio/guest room if family is over, so that should be a perfect setting for this type of recording.


I do use inexpensive Chinese mics for most of my work both as a taper and a home recordist of music.
 

Which mics are they out of curiosity? Are you content with the results they produce?

EDIT- Anyone have opinions on the Teac ME120's? I see a pair for 100 bucks in YS.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2024, 06:05:41 PM by Dan33185 »
AUD: Zoom H2
SBD: Tascam DR-60D


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Offline goodcooker

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Re: Equipment for demo recording and live recording
« Reply #16 on: June 10, 2024, 07:00:27 PM »
Do some homework on studio vs live recording techniques. Unless a live feel without the crowd is what she's after anything that is intended for release is going to stick out like a sore thumb if recorded with distant mic techniques.

You can make it work in a less than perfect space by hanging some heavy blankets (I used to use comforters and quilts from the thrift store hung over rolling clothes racks) to isolate the vocal and guitar from room reflections. Also helps if there's some furniture to break up the room.

There's loads of Youtube videos with some great tips for doing what you describe on a shoestring budget. Also some great tutorials about how to record vocals and plug in chains to get the most out of what you capture.

I would ask her to give you a couple of reference tunes to hear what she wants it to sound like which can narrow down what you need to do to produce what she's after.
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Offline Dan33185

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Re: Equipment for demo recording and live recording
« Reply #17 on: June 10, 2024, 07:16:23 PM »
Do some homework on studio vs live recording techniques. Unless a live feel without the crowd is what she's after anything that is intended for release is going to stick out like a sore thumb if recorded with distant mic techniques.

You can make it work in a less than perfect space by hanging some heavy blankets (I used to use comforters and quilts from the thrift store hung over rolling clothes racks) to isolate the vocal and guitar from room reflections. Also helps if there's some furniture to break up the room.

There's loads of Youtube videos with some great tips for doing what you describe on a shoestring budget. Also some great tutorials about how to record vocals and plug in chains to get the most out of what you capture.

I would ask her to give you a couple of reference tunes to hear what she wants it to sound like which can narrow down what you need to do to produce what she's after.

Just a straight studio feel is what she's going for...so by distant mic technique do you mean an ambient room mic? Just do away with that idea? But a mic closer to her guitar for a better sound than through her mixer should be ok? Or would using my Zoom serve the same purpose (and qualty) as that mic?
« Last Edit: June 10, 2024, 07:38:33 PM by Dan33185 »
AUD: Zoom H2
SBD: Tascam DR-60D


Make the best out of the equipment you have, something is better than nothing!

Midwest Sounds Recordings
North Country Sounds

Offline goodcooker

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Re: Equipment for demo recording and live recording
« Reply #18 on: June 11, 2024, 12:45:46 AM »

By distant mic I mean more than 1 foot away from the source.

There's a lot of ways to skin a cat. Give it a whirl with what you have to work with. Maybe ask some local tapers or musicians if you can borrow a couple of small diaphragm condenser mics and/or an LDC see what you can come up with.
Neumann KM140 || Line Audio CM3/OM1 || MBHO KA500 hyper>PFA|| ADK A51 type IV || AKG C522XY
Oade Warm Mod and Presence+ Mod UA5s || Aerco MP2(needs help) || Neve Portico 5012 || Apogee MMP
SD Mixpre6 || Oade Concert Mod DR100mkii

pocket sized - CA11 cards > SP SB10 > Sony PCM A10

http://www.archive.org/bookmarks/goodcooker

"Are you the Zman?" - fan at Panic 10-08-10 Kansas City
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Offline Dan33185

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Re: Equipment for demo recording and live recording
« Reply #19 on: June 16, 2024, 03:37:58 PM »
One more question...the mics I bought come with 3 caps (Omni, Cardioid & Super Cardioid), I am assuming I would want to use Super Cardioid for this type of recording?
AUD: Zoom H2
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Offline rowjimmy

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Re: Equipment for demo recording and live recording
« Reply #20 on: June 17, 2024, 09:34:19 AM »
If you're close-mic'ing guitar, in a zero audience situation, just use cardiod.


I do use inexpensive Chinese mics for most of my work both as a taper and a home recordist of music.
 

Which mics are they out of curiosity? Are you content with the results they produce?

I'm talking Studio Projects CP-1 ldc, Superlux pencil mics with multiple caps (though, for home studio stuff, it's all with the card caps), and a Cascade Fathead ribbon. I do have a Shure SM-7 that I use primarily for vocals and a couple SM57s for hammering nails.
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Offline Gutbucket

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Re: Equipment for demo recording and live recording
« Reply #21 on: June 17, 2024, 10:29:13 AM »
Assuming close mic'ing, the differing degree of proximity effect you'll get from different pattern capsules is going to be a significant aspect of the sound with both voice and guitar.  You will do well to take time to try them all, listen, decide.  A lot will depend on the sound of the voice and the sound of the guitar.

Be aware that its sort of the opposite of the taper experience of recording from distances where proximity effect doesn't apply so omnis tends to emphasize the low frequency content and directional mics tend to sound less warm.  An omni placed close to the source has no proximity effect and will produce less low frequency emphasis than a directional mic used close to the source.  The tighter the pattern the more low frequency thickening from proximity up close.  Slight changes of position and mic'ing distance can make a significant difference in sound.

A lot of the "up close and produced" sound of an intimate sounding type demo recording is often due to proximity effect richness.

Tight patterns can make staying in position on mic a bit more difficult for some folks though.
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Offline live2496

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Re: Equipment for demo recording and live recording
« Reply #22 on: June 17, 2024, 11:11:37 AM »
I have had good success with blending a mix of a stereo pair close to a band and blending in the vocals from the FOH mix. I do a post production mix.

My current favorite mic is an R88 stereo ribbon setup in front of the band. This gives me a good image especially with the drum kit and then reflections of the space. The mic picks up stereo from both the front and back.

I augment the recording with direct vocals from the board and just blend that in enough to give good articulation of the vocals. Recording from a distance the vocals can lose a lot of definition and mixing in some from the board makes a significant difference. The board feed can be mono as I just need the vocal up the middle.

Spaced omnis are often used in classical recording. This works nicely for stereo because usually these are very nicely designed halls for that purpose. The choice of mic depends upon the sound of the venue. If it's not a good sounding space I would go with cardiods placed closer.

If you are recording the same singer/songwriter it may take a few tries to dial in the perfect sound. Experiment and fine-tune the process until you get exactly what you are looking for.
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