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Author Topic: Order of applied effects in the remastering process  (Read 121 times)

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Offline fandelive

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Order of applied effects in the remastering process
« on: June 18, 2022, 08:21:24 AM »
Hello,

I've been trying to remaster my own live concert tapes within the last couple of years. So far I've gently experienced with a bit of EQ, Compressor, Hard-Limiter and De-clicker (hand clappers; can't blame them), Normalizer, ...
I also surgically applied a volume lowering effect (can't remember the name of that effect, please help!) on the woooooooo-ers to limit (wait, is that effect called a limiter?) their negative impact on the music.

I know the quality of the final product also depends on the order in which you apply each of those effects within the post-processing chain... and that's where I'm a bit lost.
So, how would you proceed? What effects do you like to use and in what order in the chain?

Thanks!
-fandelive
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Offline opsopcopolis

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Re: Order of applied effects in the remastering process
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2022, 10:18:52 AM »
There’s sort of an accepted order of operations, but not necessarily a right or wrong way to do it. My personal preference is EQ first, then dynamic processing (compression/limiting), then normalize if you want to. You can think about it in terms of how each process effects the next one; you don’t want to be compressing based on frequency content that you’ll be removing (hence dynamics after EQ) and you don’t want the normalize algorithm to process based on peaks that will be removed by comp/limiting/de-click (hence normalize at the end.)

All that said, if you’re using a limiter correctly, you shouldn’t need to normalize after. Set the out ceiling to something like -.1db and push the input gain until you’re limiting the stuff you’re hoping to limit.
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Online nulldogmas

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Re: Order of applied effects in the remastering process
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2022, 11:11:01 AM »
There’s sort of an accepted order of operations, but not necessarily a right or wrong way to do it. My personal preference is EQ first, then dynamic processing (compression/limiting), then normalize if you want to. You can think about it in terms of how each process effects the next one; you don’t want to be compressing based on frequency content that you’ll be removing (hence dynamics after EQ) and you don’t want the normalize algorithm to process based on peaks that will be removed by comp/limiting/de-click (hence normalize at the end.)

Yep, same here. De-clicking can take place pretty much anywhere in the process, but I prefer to do it first only so that if I end up re-EQing, I don't have to re-de-click, since that part is the most time-consuming.

And I always do EQ while leaving some headroom, so that I don't have to worry about some frequency boost leading to clipping, then normalize after. I usually apply extremely light dynamic compression for just the loudest stray peaks before normalizing — just eyeball the range that 99% of the music is within, then do like a 4:1 ratio for everything over that.

 

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