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Author Topic: Sony M-10 and 3.2V 40Ah LiFePO4  (Read 1975 times)

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Offline stancourtney

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Sony M-10 and 3.2V 40Ah LiFePO4
« on: February 09, 2012, 01:42:45 PM »
I do long term nature recording. As such I need very long large battery life. Currently I am using 12 volt / 30 ah batteries with a converter. I can record for over 30 days.

What about using something like the http://www.all-battery.com/3.2V40AhLiFePO4LithiumIronPhosphate-30217.aspx?zmam=55942680&zmas=1&zmac=1&zmap=30217  ?  It is rated at 3.2 volts. Would that be within operational values of the M-10 that is 3 volts?

Thanks,

Stan   

Offline Hypnocracy

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Re: Sony M-10 and 3.2V 40Ah LiFePO4
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2012, 07:25:49 AM »
I would say yes...

I have a Batterygeek 10-14-100 is sold for 12v devices...I run it on a Fostex FR2le...my guess is it is really 11.2v but is rated by the manufacturer at 10-14v...all I know is it runs forevah on that thing...

My buddy regularly runs his M10 on one set of Enloop rechargeable's for 20hrs....I find it strange that you have to switch out storage memory more often than batteries
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Offline sk-1

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Re: Sony M-10 and 3.2V 40Ah LiFePO4
« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2012, 07:35:26 PM »
Oh the joy that tales of the battery life of the M10 brings to me :D

There must be some way we can find the Sony design team who are responsible for this machine and organise a meet up where we can all file past them and collectively shake their hands and bow in reverence.

Anyway, I was just thinking the same thing as Stan and wonder if anyone knows the upper voltage limit to the 3V input. The actual voltage of a fully charged 3.2V cell could be around the 4.2V mark so that would need to be taken into account. 

 

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