Become a Site Supporter and Never see Ads again!

Author Topic: Building a new PC for music production and video editing  (Read 6198 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline admkrk

  • (0)
  • Taperssection All-Star
  • ****
  • Posts: 1639
  • I'm an idiot
Re: Building a new PC for music production and video editing
« Reply #15 on: August 01, 2016, 10:33:42 PM »
I did not read every post, so I do not know if this was addressed or you changed your mind, but I received an email this morning saying:
Quote
We have been informed about a class action lawsuit settlement with NVIDIA regarding the GTX 960 graphics card. Newegg is currently awaiting details about the settlement claims process (instructions, website). Once we have this important information, we will send you a follow-up email with the specifics on how you can submit your claim.

If you have any questions regarding the information provided in this email, please don't hesitate to contact Newegg Customer Service through one of the convenient contact methods provided here.

Sincerely,
Your Newegg Customer Support Team 

I have no idea what it concerns, but thought I should copy it here since you are considering one. It could just be some stupid thing that does not matter.
"the faster you go ahead, the behinder you get"

"If you can drink ram's piss, fuck, you can drink anything"

Offline hi and lo

  • (38)
  • Needs to get out more...
  • *****
  • Posts: 2314
Re: Building a new PC for music production and video editing
« Reply #16 on: August 02, 2016, 12:42:57 AM »
...
« Last Edit: August 02, 2016, 03:54:53 AM by hi and lo »

Offline hi and lo

  • (38)
  • Needs to get out more...
  • *****
  • Posts: 2314
Re: Building a new PC for music production and video editing
« Reply #17 on: August 02, 2016, 03:16:44 AM »
I did not read every post, so I do not know if this was addressed or you changed your mind, but I received an email this morning saying:
Quote
We have been informed about a class action lawsuit settlement with NVIDIA regarding the GTX 960 graphics card. Newegg is currently awaiting details about the settlement claims process (instructions, website). Once we have this important information, we will send you a follow-up email with the specifics on how you can submit your claim.

If you have any questions regarding the information provided in this email, please don't hesitate to contact Newegg Customer Service through one of the convenient contact methods provided here.

Sincerely,
Your Newegg Customer Support Team 

I have no idea what it concerns, but thought I should copy it here since you are considering one. It could just be some stupid thing that does not matter.

It looks like this is just due to a false marketing claims on the memory specifications. Some of the 9xx series cards (not limited to the 960), were advertised as having 4GB of VRAM, but it looks like only 3.5GB was accessible. Some other stuff too, but nothing major like previous Nvidia recalls (i.e. every generation of macbooks for the last 8 years).

Long story short, it looks like most 9xx users will get $30 refunded. Nothing to to worry about in terms of product reliability and very doubtful these specification differences would mean much.

Quote
Specifically, Plaintiffs allege that the GTX 970 devices were sold based on misleading representations that the devices: (1) operate with a full 4 gigabytes (“GB”) of video access memory (“VRAM”) instead of the actual 3.5 GB of VRAM and a “less performant” and decoupled 0.5 GB spillover segment that operates as slow as one- seventh the speed of the 3.5 GB pool once the device is required to access more than 3.5 GB of memory, (2) have 64 render output processors (“ROPs”), as opposed to 56 ROPs, and (3) have an L2 cache capacity of 2,048 kilobytes (“KB”), as opposed to 1,792 KB, and omitted material facts to the contrary. See Second Amended Consolidated Class Action Complaint (“SACC”) ¶ 4. Defendants have denied these allegations and asserted numerous defenses.

Offline voltronic

  • (34)
  • Needs to get out more...
  • *****
  • Posts: 3375
Re: Building a new PC for music production and video editing
« Reply #18 on: August 02, 2016, 10:14:21 PM »
OK, as promised here is the full parts list of my current build:

http://pcpartpicker.com/list/2Fh3Fd

The following parts were reused from my old system; the remaining parts were new:
SSD
HDDs (Samsung and WD)
Video Card
Monitor
Blu-Ray drive
FW card
Audio interface

My research always starts with Silent PC Review.  Not only do they do an extremely thorough job in reviewing electrical characteristics of PSUs, they are are very detailed in testing everything, particularly fans, heatsinks, cases, and video cards.  For someone doing audio work and wanting the best performance with the least noise, you cannot go wrong with their recommendations.

For example: Noctua coolers are indeed excellent, but if you look at the test results on this page, you'll see that the Scythe Koetsu equals the two big Noctua's performance in deg C rise vs. SPL, and costing much less.

Logical Increments is also a great place to go to for what's current and at the best prices.  That's how I came across the CPU and MB I chose as being solid choices.
DPA 4061 ~ Line Audio CM3 ~ Naiant X-Q ~ AT 853  |  Naiant PFAs ~ Shure FP24  |  Zoom F6 ~ Sony PCM-M10
MOTU M2 ~ KRK Rokit RP5 ~ Sennheiser HD 650 ~ Etymotic ER4XR

Team Line Audio

Offline if_then_else

  • (0)
  • Taperssection Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 367
Re: Building a new PC for music production and video editing
« Reply #19 on: August 03, 2016, 02:41:11 AM »
Thanks again for your feed-back. It's always good to hear what people with a similar background think about these hardware components.

Quote
Motherboard, ASUS Z170-P.  ASUS boards are worth it for the excellent fan control alone, and this is a better choice than the one you chose for less money.

The thing is that >95% of the time I'll be working with Linux. While the Gigabyte GA-H170-HD3 (DDR4) mainboard is supported out of the box, a lot of issues (in particular sound-related ones) have been reported with the ASUS Z170-P. Moreover, I'm not going to use over-clocking, therefore a Z series mainboard won't be necessary in my specific case.

Quote
Your selected Motherboard does not have digital audio I/O. What are your requirements for audio playback and downstream equipment? I would never recommend using the built-in analog outputs.

Again, the answer to this question is related to Linux. I'm going to use an external USB 2.0 audio interface. In fact, on Linux there are just two viable options that are said to work out of the box - the Focusrite Scarlett series and the Native Instruments Komplete Audio 6. Some people have reported issues with the the Focusrite Scarlett (i.e. crackling noises on startup or after hibernation), therefore I'm going to buy the Native Instruments device.

Quote
Get a caviar black and never look back.

Checked. Thanks for the hint.

Quote
hi and lo, please justify your recommendation of 32 GB of RAM.  Unless you're running a server or doing pro 3D animation, there aren't many applications that can address that much, and it's also OS dependent

In fact, I'm an IT application engineer and I'm going to use several DBs and application servers for software testing. I might run a few other memory intensive applications like advanced log management frameworks (e.g. Splunk, ELK, etc.) or several virtual machines at a time. I've never been a gamer, though. So, every suggestion related to optimizing my PC gaming experience might indeed by overkill.

IMHO, it can't hurt to have >16 GB of RAM (as it's rather inexpensive). Depending on whether the video editing software can make use of GPU acceleration, one might need more or less RAM.

Quote
OP also states that he might need to run windows, so a VM could be in play (in lieu of dual booting). A perfect reason to have more ram. If you're doing any kind of video editing, you don't want to be splitting 16GB between the primary OS and a VM.

I'd rather not use a VM for video editing because VMs tend to use generic drivers. Performance-wise, it might be better to use a dedicated physical partition for Windows and the belonging software applications on the SSD. I'm going to use two separate HDDs for the source files (aka "master" recordings) respectively for the resulting, fully-processed audio and video files. Otherwise, concurrent read/write access to the same HDD might lead to a performance bottleneck.

Offline admkrk

  • (0)
  • Taperssection All-Star
  • ****
  • Posts: 1639
  • I'm an idiot
Re: Building a new PC for music production and video editing
« Reply #20 on: August 03, 2016, 08:15:07 PM »
It looks like this is just due to a false marketing claims on the memory specifications. Some of the 9xx series cards (not limited to the 960), were advertised as having 4GB of VRAM, but it looks like only 3.5GB was accessible. Some other stuff too, but nothing major like previous Nvidia recalls (i.e. every generation of macbooks for the last 8 years).

I figured it was probably nothing, but didn't look into it. I haven't noticed any problems with my card.
"the faster you go ahead, the behinder you get"

"If you can drink ram's piss, fuck, you can drink anything"

 

RSS | Mobile
Page created in 0.047 seconds with 29 queries.
© 2002-2021 Taperssection.com
Powered by SMF