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Author Topic: Repairing direct drive capstan (Sony TC-D5M)  (Read 359 times)

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Offline siseturist

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Repairing direct drive capstan (Sony TC-D5M)
« on: March 11, 2021, 09:46:26 AM »
Hello!

Some years ago I managed to buy a used portable tape recorder Sony TC-D5M, which has a direct drive mechanism. It means that the motor sits on a rubberized plate, on which the other side is the capstan. But as I assume it had been on a shelf for a long time (perhaps more than 10 years) without any use. It's not in the cosmetically best shape and it makes a ticking sound while playing. Have opened it up a while ago and it most certainly is caused by a small dent which has been caused by the head of the motor which has been giving the rubberized surface some tension.
As it's been impossible to find a replacement capstan I've been thinking of repairing it myself. Has anyone ever rubberized direct drive capstan? Some advice from people who've done it before would be great.
I've been thinking of 1st removing the existing rubber and then covering parts that don't need the rubber, and then spray coating the needed areas with rubber spray. Would that sound logical?


Offline Melanie

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Re: Repairing direct drive capstan (Sony TC-D5M)
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2021, 12:47:24 PM »
Maybe you can use some thin heat shrink tubing. Some of it is more "rubbery" then others, I would think that the thickness of the rubber would matter in terms of playback speed.

Offline siseturist

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Re: Repairing direct drive capstan (Sony TC-D5M)
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2021, 12:52:35 PM »
Maybe you can use some thin heat shrink tubing. Some of it is more "rubbery" then others, I would think that the thickness of the rubber would matter in terms of playback speed.

The thickness shouldn't make it faster or slower – as you see on the left side of the capstan back side, the motor sits on the capstan plate and not on the edge. Meaning the diameter of the connection to the plate wouldn't change.
The motor also sits to the capstan with a small spring attached, which means that it gives pressure to the capstan, but can also move (like a shock absorber)

Regarding the heat shrink tube – do you imagine it being cut out and glued on the metal surface?

Offline jerryfreak

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Re: Repairing direct drive capstan (Sony TC-D5M)
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2021, 07:17:55 PM »
id try tapeheads site... ill bet someone has addressed something similar
currently "banned" for this "controversial" post
email me if you need to connect

re:this R700 door issue (https://taperssection.com/index.php?topic=196992.0;topicseen) you need to lubricate the mechanism so the limit switch that makes-on-open gets full contact. a hack is a quick tug on the metal bar below where the tape sits, wil close the switch and prevent retraction

Offline Melanie

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Re: Repairing direct drive capstan (Sony TC-D5M)
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2021, 11:57:44 AM »
Maybe you can use some thin heat shrink tubing. Some of it is more "rubbery" then others, I would think that the thickness of the rubber would matter in terms of playback speed.

The thickness shouldn't make it faster or slower – as you see on the left side of the capstan back side, the motor sits on the capstan plate and not on the edge. Meaning the diameter of the connection to the plate wouldn't change.
The motor also sits to the capstan with a small spring attached, which means that it gives pressure to the capstan, but can also move (like a shock absorber)

Regarding the heat shrink tube – do you imagine it being cut out and glued on the metal surface?
After a closer inspection of photo I realize I was mistaken about the heat shrink, don't think it would work. A very thin piece of rubber carefully glued down may work, spray rubber may not be able to stay in place, but haven't had any experience with that.

 

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