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Author Topic: Why is this not a good idea. wcgr  (Read 1985 times)

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Offline fanofjam

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Re: Why is this not a good idea. wcgr
« Reply #15 on: January 28, 2018, 08:34:05 AM »
Next question.
Should I burry the mics in the stage close to the drums and amps?  Or perimeter the stage in a triangle of sorts?

The closer you place the mics to an instrument, the more prominent is that instrument in a recording.  The danger is that getting too close to one of the sound sources drowns out everything else, so unless you have multiple mics and a multi track recorder so you can isolate on each instrument, getting too close isn't a good idea for stereo recording. 

I'd try to position the left mic so that it picks up equal volumes of the instruments on the left side of the stage and same for the right side.  Unfortunately, its not always easy to do that because instruments in stage aren't always the same volume, especially if there's a drummer and he plays agressive.  Use your ears to determine the best spot. 

Finally, a typical challenge with stage mic'ing is getting good vocals since the vocals are usually only projected through one of the  stage monitors and through the PA stack out into the audience.  The typical on-stage recording has vocals that sound faint and distant in the recording.  Ideally you'd have a separate mic dedicated to recording vocals, say by mic'ing the vocal monitor, but it sounds like this isn't an option for your current rig.  In that case you might need to either move the mics out into the audience and record the sound coming from the PA or just live with a recording with faint vocals. (This is one of the reasons I love instrumental bands...lol.)

Offline Elguapo511

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Re: Why is this not a good idea. wcgr
« Reply #16 on: January 28, 2018, 12:28:05 PM »
I am lacking the talent to use these in studio.

So the clubs have the action.  And a nice tight room can has the magic

Offline Elguapo511

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Re: Why is this not a good idea. wcgr
« Reply #17 on: January 28, 2018, 03:00:02 PM »
The tascam dr-2d has two stereo inputs,  so it’s a four track recorder.

I have one mic dedicated to vocals and three of these Omni directional dynamic s

It’s a weird rig,  but the mics are very clear and balanced, and pics up everything.
Next question.
Should I burry the mics in the stage close to the drums and amps?  Or perimeter the stage in a triangle of sorts?

The closer you place the mics to an instrument, the more prominent is that instrument in a recording.  The danger is that getting too close to one of the sound sources drowns out everything else, so unless you have multiple mics and a multi track recorder so you can isolate on each instrument, getting too close isn't a good idea for stereo recording. 

I'd try to position the left mic so that it picks up equal volumes of the instruments on the left side of the stage and same for the right side.  Unfortunately, its not always easy to do that because instruments in stage aren't always the same volume, especially if there's a drummer and he plays agressive.  Use your ears to determine the best spot. 

Finally, a typical challenge with stage mic'ing is getting good vocals since the vocals are usually only projected through one of the  stage monitors and through the PA stack out into the audience.  The typical on-stage recording has vocals that sound faint and distant in the recording.  Ideally you'd have a separate mic dedicated to recording vocals, say by mic'ing the vocal monitor, but it sounds like this isn't an option for your current rig.  In that case you might need to either move the mics out into the audience and record the sound coming from the PA or just live with a recording with faint vocals. (This is one of the reasons I love instrumental bands...lol.)

Offline nak700s

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Re: Why is this not a good idea. wcgr
« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2018, 01:24:37 PM »
I am using these mic because they are all I have.

I have three ev 655c and one other directional dynamic that I put right in front of the vocal speaker.

It’s a small stage and I can put the mics anywhere.

Next question.
Should I burry the mics in the stage close to the drums and amps?  Or perimeter the stage in a triangle of sorts?

Unfortunately, mic placement when dealing with being able to set up on stage, is a learning curve based solely on your experience with your specific microphones.  You can take our advice, but do so in conjunction with your knowledge of how those mics perform.  That said, here's my advice.  I should also say, I do "stage" recording at least once a week, BUT, my equipment is not the same as your equipment...
In most situations, the vocalists will be up front and have vocal monitors directly in front of them at their feet.  I would recommend using an Omni facing towards the band, on a stand between 2.5 - 3 feet high next to, but partially in front of the monitors angle.  This should assure your vocals are not weak.  Another way, if you have a true 4-track recorder, is to take a line out of the soundboard for two of the channels, and use microphones directed more at the bass and drums, as they are not usually mic'd or running through the board in small bars.  If you only have one directional mic, use it for something more distant on stage, like the bass, which is often located towards the back in smaller venues.  On stage mic applications are a good use for Omni's as they will draw a little crowd noise , creating a warmer, more live sound (especially if the band is personable and responds to the audience).  It is also OK to direct an Omni directly between two instrument's amps, or drums, etc.  I hate to tell you this, but it may take more than one try to get it right, so write down what you do to compare recordings going forward.  Most of all, have fun with it!  It's a lot of fun experimenting like this when you have free range with the band.
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Offline Elguapo511

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Re: Why is this not a good idea. wcgr
« Reply #19 on: February 27, 2018, 03:06:04 PM »
these pics are very smooth.

I took them to a JRAD performance at the Riviera and its a nice huge sound.  Lots of talking during the quiet parts and definitely an audience recording.  but its all there.

given that i don't need a pre amp, or extra power to run these, ill  probably stick with them for a while,  cuz its all i got.

 

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