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Author Topic: Dayton Audio Bookshelf Speaker Kit Build, sort of  (Read 294 times)

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Offline kindms

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Dayton Audio Bookshelf Speaker Kit Build, sort of
« on: May 14, 2018, 07:14:00 PM »


kind of a crappy picture but I finally got around to finishing the kit a week or so back.

https://www.parts-express.com/c-note-mt-bookshelf-speaker-kit-pair-with-knock-down-cabinets--300-7140

It gave me an even greater appreciation for our resident cable makers etc. Soldering im slowly learning but holy crap its an art all by itself.

what you are seeing in the pic is the Class A Musichall Mambo i'm always trying to sell here, I actually with the help of watching 100s of youtube videos on various ribbon connections on circuit boards was able to finally carefully remove the DAC section from the chassis. That allowed me to use a ball peen hammer and correct the damage on the back plate of the amp. That made it so the binding posts are almost perfectly straight again. The binding posts I purchased fro that repair (which didnt fit) became the genesis of this speaker kit build. The binding posts were by far the most expensive parts it seemed. also pictured is a Pioneer elite DVD-A player and an ancient tv that still actually works albeit with some missing buttons. Oh and a Fiio X1 2nd Gen also feeding the integrated AMP.

It sounds pretty damn good IMHO. a good amount of bass for the bookshelves. This is currently my "barn" system. Its not really a barn, it is a 500sqft workshop ? or place to hide or whatever ;)





« Last Edit: May 16, 2018, 07:41:17 PM by kindms »
AKG414 XLS/ST> TCM-Mod Tascam HDP2
Musichall Mambo > VR-2's

Offline Jammin72

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Re: Dayton Audio Bookshelf Speaker Kit Build, sort of
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2018, 12:20:50 PM »

Grats on finishing the project!  Nice hideaway setup.
Yes, but what do you HEAR?

Offline Gutbucket

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Re: Dayton Audio Bookshelf Speaker Kit Build, sort of
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2018, 02:33:34 PM »
Nice work.  Was seriously considering building a number like these (or similar) for a portable surround playback system I've working on.  I ended buying 4 pairs of DefTech ProCinema-800 which are somewhat smaller and all fit perfectly into one big Pelican-style suitcase. Also I'd probably take forever to finish the build if I had to assemble 7 or 8 of them.

Are you going to build a sub for them as well, or are you content with them as they are?  Asking because I still need to figure out a sub (or two) for this portable system, and might build something based on Dayton Audio parts.  I'm considering using the positive-latching air-tight-gasket-sealed suitcase as the enclosure for the sub.  Will make for a rather heavy suitcase carry with all the speakers loaded in it, but would make for a rather compact portable system. 

A friend had an old portable Cambridge Audio stereo sat/sub system which worked that way (suitcase sub housed the speakers and amp) and it sounded pretty good for what it was.  We'd take it with us on the road to listen to our recordings once back at camp or in the hotel room.   This will sort of be similar but on steroids.
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Offline kindms

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Re: Dayton Audio Bookshelf Speaker Kit Build, sort of
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2018, 04:46:35 PM »
Nice work.  Was seriously considering building a number like these (or similar) for a portable surround playback system I've working on.  I ended buying 4 pairs of DefTech ProCinema-800 which are somewhat smaller and all fit perfectly into one big Pelican-style suitcase. Also I'd probably take forever to finish the build if I had to assemble 7 or 8 of them.

Are you going to build a sub for them as well, or are you content with them as they are?  Asking because I still need to figure out a sub (or two) for this portable system, and might build something based on Dayton Audio parts.  I'm considering using the positive-latching air-tight-gasket-sealed suitcase as the enclosure for the sub.  Will make for a rather heavy suitcase carry with all the speakers loaded in it, but would make for a rather compact portable system. 

A friend had an old portable Cambridge Audio stereo sat/sub system which worked that way (suitcase sub housed the speakers and amp) and it sounded pretty good for what it was.  We'd take it with us on the road to listen to our recordings once back at camp or in the hotel room.   This will sort of be similar but on steroids.

Debating adding to the project. I am happy with the sound as is but ......I have all the necessary EQ to do another build so its now just a parts thing. Soldering station, i picked up a few more wood clamps (like I needed more), everything else i have a bunch of leftovers

I already have my main playback which is the outlaw audio monoblocks feeding VR2s and I have a 3.1 system in the living room (Klipsch 1.5s and a Energy 10" sub). The Dayton are very similar to the KG1.5s in size and design. So not sure what I am going to do if anything. I did very much enjoy building them except for soldering the binding posts. Holy crap that was a HUGE pain in the ass compared to soldering the crossovers.

I made a few power cables as well for my rig to get used to soldering. Got some shrink wrap as i had a heat gun I inherited from my grandfather when he passed.
AKG414 XLS/ST> TCM-Mod Tascam HDP2
Musichall Mambo > VR-2's

Offline Gutbucket

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Re: Dayton Audio Bookshelf Speaker Kit Build, sort of
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2018, 05:25:16 PM »
I made a few power cables as well for my rig to get used to soldering. Got some shrink wrap as i had a heat gun I inherited from my grandfather when he passed.

The toughest thing for me about reterminating mics, making cables and interconnects (other than soldering super-fine gauge hair thin wires) is remembering to slide the heatshrink and/or other parts on the wire before soldering to the connector!  Can't tell you how many times I've had to redo the joints after realizing that mistake.
volition > vibrations > voltages > numeric values | numeric values > voltages > vibrations> virtual teleportation time-machine experience
made easy- >>Improved PAS table<< | made excellent- >>click here to download the Oddball Microphone Technique illustrated PDF booklet<<

Offline goodcooker

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Re: Dayton Audio Bookshelf Speaker Kit Build, sort of
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2018, 06:28:01 PM »
remembering to slide the heatshrink and/or other parts on the wire before soldering to the connector!

This was the bane of my existence when I was making a lot of cables for people. I never reused connectors for paying customers and "ate" quite a few connectors because I didn't slide the housing or strain relief on to the wire first...
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Offline kindms

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Re: Dayton Audio Bookshelf Speaker Kit Build, sort of
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2018, 06:39:32 PM »
remembering to slide the heatshrink and/or other parts on the wire before soldering to the connector!

This was the bane of my existence when I was making a lot of cables for people. I never reused connectors for paying customers and "ate" quite a few connectors because I didn't slide the housing or strain relief on to the wire first...

interestingly enough I was really good at doing that part. i had it all thought out (granted for only a few parts). I used the heat shrink on the input wires for the biding posts. I had the nuts and washers already on inside and then the heat shrink so I could reverse and go backwards for the wrap and then nuts/bolts. It came out pretty good. I surprised myself considering that its that kind of stuff where my burnt brain likes to fail me.

Ill snap a few pics closer up next time im out there. We have torrential rain and tornado warnings just passing.

Any tricks to soldering wire to solid metal like binding posts ? After failing numerous times i finally just got the damn thing blazingly hot and it seemed to do the trick but probably a better way
AKG414 XLS/ST> TCM-Mod Tascam HDP2
Musichall Mambo > VR-2's

Offline Gutbucket

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Re: Dayton Audio Bookshelf Speaker Kit Build, sort of
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2018, 09:09:00 AM »
Sufficient heat mostly, and flux.

Big stuff is difficult because the part acts as heatsink, which makes it difficult to get sufficient localized heat to allow the joint to flow.  Helps to have a higher wattage iron or a soldering gun for bigger metal parts, capable of getting enough heat in quickly enough to make the joint before the entire part heats up fully.  A smaller iron which works great for small individual wire connections may struggle to heat the entire part or may not work at all for something like a shield ground connection to the connector housing or heavy gauge copper connections for example.

Other that that, basic thermal dynamics stuff always applies-
Heat rises so place the iron underneath the area to be heated rather than on top.
Wet the iron sufficiently with a blob of fresh molten solder for efficient heat transfer from iron to part.
volition > vibrations > voltages > numeric values | numeric values > voltages > vibrations> virtual teleportation time-machine experience
made easy- >>Improved PAS table<< | made excellent- >>click here to download the Oddball Microphone Technique illustrated PDF booklet<<

Offline kindms

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Re: Dayton Audio Bookshelf Speaker Kit Build, sort of
« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2018, 07:42:39 PM »
Sufficient heat mostly, and flux.

Big stuff is difficult because the part acts as heatsink, which makes it difficult to get sufficient localized heat to allow the joint to flow.  Helps to have a higher wattage iron or a soldering gun for bigger metal parts, capable of getting enough heat in quickly enough to make the joint before the entire part heats up fully.  A smaller iron which works great for small individual wire connections may struggle to heat the entire part or may not work at all for something like a shield ground connection to the connector housing or heavy gauge copper connections for example.

Other that that, basic thermal dynamics stuff always applies-
Heat rises so place the iron underneath the area to be heated rather than on top.
Wet the iron sufficiently with a blob of fresh molten solder for efficient heat transfer from iron to part.

i wish i had asked before of plunging ahead.some good advice above

i added a couple pics that show the speaker better
AKG414 XLS/ST> TCM-Mod Tascam HDP2
Musichall Mambo > VR-2's

 

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