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Author Topic: Film Audio Recommendations  (Read 3215 times)

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Offline scrtaper

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Film Audio Recommendations
« on: January 16, 2019, 09:29:49 PM »
Hi, Im working on a few short films and i am in charge of doing audio, i was wondering of some recommendations for boom poles, counter weights, and shock mounts for a senheiser mkh 416, ive used a few and the ones i used still gave me some low end boom from finger movement on the boom
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Offline DavidPuddy

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Re: Film Audio Recommendations
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2019, 10:20:30 AM »
Hi, Im working on a few short films and i am in charge of doing audio, i was wondering of some recommendations for boom poles, counter weights, and shock mounts for a senheiser mkh 416, ive used a few and the ones i used still gave me some low end boom from finger movement on the boom

Can't recommend anything for the first two.

Have you tried a Rycote shockmount? It looks like this one was made for your application: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/880280-REG/Rycote_041118_INV_8_Microphone_Suspension.html

They're not cheap though.
Mics: nbobs/480+ck61/62/63; C568EB; MKE2
Recorders: MP6; A10

Offline Ronmac

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Re: Film Audio Recommendations
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2019, 12:28:21 PM »
Will you be shooting inside, or outside? If you are going outside it is all but impossible to run without a full Rycote or Sennheiser blimp and deadcat.

Reducing handling noise when booming is a skill that takes practice and good gear. It's almost a 50/50 relationship. Wear gloves, keep the cable tight and move the pole with deliberate and smooth action and you should be OK most of the time. If you are making wide swings indoors a foam cover helps eliminate "swoosh" sounds. Moving a mic through air creates the same pressure variances as moving air on a static mic.

Having a good headphone feed to hear what the mic is getting is crucial. You don't want too many surprises when you get to post.

A 416 doesn't have a low-cut filter, so engage the one on the recorder if it has one or do a cut at post.

Offline scrtaper

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Re: Film Audio Recommendations
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2019, 12:24:56 AM »
thank you
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Offline Martinez Llorca

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Re: Film Audio Recommendations
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2020, 08:49:19 AM »
Even if I'm now retired, perhaps my experience and advice can help.

When I started in location recording we had only film and the recorder of choice was usually a Nagra: III, 4.0 and 4.2. Later came the stereo model, but I never got to use one.

Where I lived, Argentina, the recordist handled the whole audio operation, since picking locations to the final film copy. You advised and were responsible for all audio things in the film.

Even if I followed on on the business for some time, only renting audio equipment for film & video, I did follow how things were being done. Wireless mic became better and better, and nobody would probably do a location or even studio recording nowadays without using a few, even if you are using a pole mic.

But I always used and would use a directional mic, taping it on a separate channel and mixing in post-production with the other mics.

Why? Because there's something called "sound plane" that gives more authenticity and makes it sound more natural. You will have to learn and pay attention to how people's voices (fiction of documentary) sound, particularly when you go from a wide open shot to a close-up. The only mic that can provide such difference is the pole mic, because a lapel mic will always sound the same, with no difference.

I have no knowledge or idea about your experience on location recording, so please let me know if you already know what I'm talking about.   

 

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